Carlos Quentin drops appeal, begins serving eight-game suspension on Sunday

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Padres outfielder Carlos Quentin has dropped the appeal of his eight-game suspension and will begin serving the sentence on Sunday. This according to staff writer Scott Bair of the North County Times.

Quentin charged at Dodgers starter Zack Greinke and broke the right-hander’s left collarbone on Thursday after getting hit by a pitch. That set off a benches-clearing brawl that resulted in Dodgers utilityman Jerry Hairston Jr. receiving a one-game suspension of his own. Hairston appealed that but hasn’t heard back from the commissioner’s office.

Quentin was hoping to have his sentence reduced a few games, but he wasn’t going to be very active in the Padres’ upcoming series with the Dodgers — to avoid added drama — so he decided to go ahead and get the eight-game suspension started. That should be a heated three-game set even without Quentin around.

Greinke underwent surgery for his fractured clavicle on Sunday and will miss the next eight weeks. Quentin, 30, was batting .174/.310/.304 with no homers and four strikeouts through 29 plate appearances.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.