What in the hell is Major League Baseball doing with Biogenesis?

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It was up late last night and was sort of overwhelmed by the Dodgers-Padres brawl, but in case you missed it, go read Matthew’s post about the latest in the Biogenesis business. The upshot:  Major League Baseball is reportedly paying an ex-Biogenesis employee for documents relating to the case.

Feature how this works: your employer goes to one of you health care providers, buys your medical records from them, reads them, and then uses that information to discipline you at work.  You cool with that? If you’re not, please explain to me how what MLB is reportedly doing here is in any way defensible.

Also: if MLB is so convinced that the lawsuit they filed is righteous and justifiable, why are they now circumventing it to get the documents in question?

At some point it would be cool if MLB actually made some sort of statement about what they’re doing here. Because it makes absolutely no sense to me. How on earth do they expect any suspensions they dole out based on this tactic to hold up to an arbitrator’s review?

Brewers to give Mike Moustakas a look at second base

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The Brewers reportedly signed third baseman Mike Moustakas to a one-year, $10 million contract on Sunday. While the deal is not yet official, MLB.com’s Adam McCalvy reports that the Brewers plan to give Moustakas a look at second base during spring training. If all goes well, he will be the primary second baseman and Travis Shaw will stay at third base.

The initial thought was that Moustakas would simply take over at third base for the more versatile Shaw. Moustakas has spent 8,035 of his career defensive innings at third base, 35 innings at first base, and none at second. In fact, he has never played second base as a pro player. Shaw, meanwhile, has spent 268 of his 4,073 1/3 defensive innings in the majors at second base and played there as recently as October.

This is certainly an interesting wrinkle to signing Moustakas, who is a decent third baseman. He was victimized by another slow free agent market, not signing until March last year on a $6.5 million deal with a $15 million mutual option for this season. That option was declined, obviously, and he ended up signing for $5 million cheaper here in February as the Brewers waited him out. Notably, Moustakas did not have qualifying offer compensation attached to him this time around.

Last season, between the Royals and Brewers, the 30-year-old Moustakas hit .251/.315/.459 with 28 home runs and 95 RBI in 635 plate appearances.