What in the hell is Major League Baseball doing with Biogenesis?

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It was up late last night and was sort of overwhelmed by the Dodgers-Padres brawl, but in case you missed it, go read Matthew’s post about the latest in the Biogenesis business. The upshot:  Major League Baseball is reportedly paying an ex-Biogenesis employee for documents relating to the case.

Feature how this works: your employer goes to one of you health care providers, buys your medical records from them, reads them, and then uses that information to discipline you at work.  You cool with that? If you’re not, please explain to me how what MLB is reportedly doing here is in any way defensible.

Also: if MLB is so convinced that the lawsuit they filed is righteous and justifiable, why are they now circumventing it to get the documents in question?

At some point it would be cool if MLB actually made some sort of statement about what they’re doing here. Because it makes absolutely no sense to me. How on earth do they expect any suspensions they dole out based on this tactic to hold up to an arbitrator’s review?

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?