Report: A-Rod’s representatives purchased the Biogenesis documents

100 Comments

Admit it: In your heart, you knew it was A-Rod. It’s OK. I thought it might have been too.

Last night the New York Times reported that Major League Baseball’s was attempting to purchase documents from the now-defunct Biogenesis anti-aging clinic.  These documents, as was reported back in January, purport to show that multiple major league ballplayers — as many as 90 by some estimates — obtained banned performance enhancing drugs from Biogenesis and its operator Anthony Bosch.

The documents have formed the basis of a series of eye-opening reports on the matter, but thus far have only been obtained by various media outlets who have chosen not to share them with Major League Baseball. Major League Baseball, of course, would like to see them in order to investigate the reports of PED-using players and, ultimately, discipline said players.  Two weeks ago baseball sued Biogenesis in an effort to get the documents. Now the reports are that Major League Baseball is simply trying to buy them.

According to the New York times, these efforts were spurred by more than a mere desire to get them for baseball’s own sake. Rather, there were rumors that a ballplayer named in the documents was himself trying to purchase them, with an eye toward destroying them and, presumably, head off discipline. Delicious.

Now, Michael S. Schmidt of the New York Times reports who that player is:

The full New York Times report, in which it is alleged that an associate of Alex Rodriguez purchased the documents, can be read here. For his part, Rodriguez’s representatives are flatly denying the report.

If there is an actual basis to this, one wonders if MLB might consider it enough, in and of itself, to consider A-Rod uncooperative with their investigation and thus suspend him summarily pursuant to the Joint Drug Agreement which requires players to cooperate with the league.

At the moment, though, I think MLB would really have to explain why it believes A-Rod was attempting to destroy them. What the basis for that is. Because that’s a pretty serious accusation to hurl without a strong foundation for it.

Either way, however, this story is getting out of control.  If A-Rod did destroy the documents he’s gone super villain on us.  If he did not, and MLB or its surrogates are spinning innuendo, they’ve gone mad instead.

Dustin Pedroia going back on injured list

Getty Images
4 Comments

Welp, that didn’t last long. Red Sox second baseman Dustin Pedroia is going back on the injured list with more knee issues. If it matters the Sox say it’s not a big deal and they expect him back sooner rather than later, but they also said that his post-2017 knee surgery was just a “cleanup” at first and that basically cost him a year. So.

Pedroia has played in six games and is 2-for-20 with a walk.

I don’t think it’s hyperbole to say that Pedroia’s career may be nearing an end. Sure, he’s under contract for two more years after this season, but he’s also in a unfortunate spiral that so many players experience in their mid-to-late 30s.

Running a website like this makes it all the clearer, actually. When you search a player’s name in our CMS, you get every post in which he appears in reverse chronological order. Just about every long-tenured player ends with about six posts in which he is alternately placed on and activated from the disabled/injured list. Then an offseason link to a big feature in which he’s written about as being “at a crossroads” followed by something vague about “resuming baseball activities” and then, inevitably, the retirement announcement. I can’t count the number of guys whose careers I can tick off in that way by browsing the guts of this site.

I hope that’s not the case for Pedroia. I hope that there’s a “Pedroia wins Comeback Player of the Year” post in the future. Or at the very least a silly “Miller’s Crossing” reference in an “And that Happened” in which I say “the old man’s still an artist with the Thompson” after he peppers the ball around in some 3-for-4, two-double game. I want that stuff to happen.

It’s just that, if you watch this game long enough, you realize how unlikely that is once a player starts to break down.