Tim Lincecum starts and Buster Posey sits

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Here we go again: the Tim Lincecum-Buster Posey pairing the Giants did their best to avoid throughout the second half of last season was supposed to be back on this year. Manager Bruce Bochy was very clear on that both over the winter and this spring. And, yet, Hector Sanchez will catch Lincecum for the second straight start Tuesday.

The Giants had a good excuse for not using Posey in Lincecum’s first start: Brandon Belt was sick and the team had the hole at first base anyway. This time, it’s being played as just a routine day off for Posey. But it’s obvious that the Giants are actively trying to stay away from the pairing.

Often working with Posey, Lincecum had a dreadful spring, giving up 18 earned runs in 15 1/3 innings. However, in his season debut last week with Sanchez behind the plate, he held the Dodgers to a pair of unearned runs over five innings in a win, though he did walk seven batters. As Grant Brisbee points out over at McCovey Chronicles, some of those walks could be blamed on Sanchez.

Some have suggested there’s real animosity between Lincecum and Posey, but both have denied that. Obviously, it’d be in Lincecum’s best interests to be on the same page with Posey; taking his bat or Brandon Belt’s out of the lineup cuts back on run support. Besides, Posey is a better defensive catcher than Sanchez. But if Lincecum is that much more comfortable with Sanchez, it’s probably not worth it for Bochy to force the issue right now.

Last year, Lincecum had a 5.46 ERA in 15 outings with Posey behind the plate, compared to a 4.87 ERA in 16 outings with Sanchez. He didn’t seem to have any difficulties with Posey before that. In 2011, Lincecum had a 1.55 ERA in nine games with Posey before Posey got hurt. In 2010, he was better with Bengie Molina behind the plate (3.23 ERA to 3.76 ERA).

Report: Six teams are in on Troy Tulowitzki

Troy Tulowitzki
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At least six teams are interested in free agent shortstop Troy Tulowitzki, according to a recent report from Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle. Known suitors include the Cubs, who will reportedly be in attendance during one of the shortstop’s offseason workouts as they decide whether or not to press forward with a deal.

The Blue Jays released Tulowitzki on Tuesday as general manager Ross Atkins admitted he couldn’t rely on the 34-year-old to bounce back from season-ending bone spur removal surgery and be the kind of consistent presence the club needed going forward. Toronto is expected to absorb the remaining $38 million on Tulowitzki’s contract, which includes the $20 million he’s due in 2019, another $14 million in 2020 and a $4 million buyout in 2021.

The veteran slugger will be available to any interested team at a minimum $600,000, an undeniably attractive bargain if he recovers in advance of the 2019 season. He last appeared in the majors in 2017 and slashed .249/.300/.378 with 17 extra-base hits and a .678 OPS through 260 PA. Per Slusser, Tulowitzki appears to be angling for a job with the Athletics — even going so far as to say he’d be willing to switch positions in order to play for a winning team — though they have yet to reach out about a potential deal this winter.