Albert Pujols suggests that he will walk away from his Angels contract if he’s not producing

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From Mike DiGiovanna of the Los Angeles Times:

After hitting two homers and drawing three intentional walks in Saturday’s 8-4 win, Pujols gave a strong indication he will not allow himself to become an albatross to the Angels.

“God has given me ability and talent, but the day I feel like I can’t compete any more on this level, I’m not going to embarrass myself,” Pujols said. “I’m going to walk off. Whether that’s next year, two years from now, only God knows.”

It’s difficult to believe that Pujols is going to stick by that because other highly-paid baseball players have said similar things in the past and then cashed their checks anyway. The MLBPA would certainly frown on it for the precedent that it might set.

Pujols signed a 10-year, $240 million free agent contract with the Angels in December 2011. The 33-year-old first baseman will earn $16 million this season, $23 million in 2014, $24 million in 2015, $25 million in 2016, $26 million in 2017, $27 million in 2018, $28 million in 2019, $29 million in 2020 and $30 million in 2021.

He also holds a 10-year, $10 million personal services contract that will take effect once he retires.

Brewers promote David Stearns from GM to president of baseball operations

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It used to be that the top dog in a team’s baseball operations department was the general manager. That has changed over the past several years with some combination of title inflation, a genuine addition of supervisory layers and, on some level, employe poaching insurance leading to the top dog now being called, usually, a “president of baseball operations.”

Brewers’ general manager David Stearns is the latest to assume that tile, as the club just announced that he has been promoted to Milwaukee’s president of baseball operations. He has also received a contract extension of unknown length.

Not a big shock given how well the Brewers did in 2018, winning the NL Central title and playing in the NLCS. It’s also worth noting — with a nod to that “employee poaching insurance” item above — that Stearns has drawn some interest from other organizations. It’s thus not unfair to see the promotion is both a thanks for a job well done and a means of keeping other teams’ hands off of him, as employees are generally not given permission to interview for lateral moves, but are given permission to interview for promotions.

The Mudville Nine may have wanted to steal him from Milwaukee, but for Stearns to get a promotion from where he is now would require the creation of some other lofty title.