Ryan Ludwick out three months following shoulder surgery

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Ryan Ludwick suffered a dislocated right shoulder while sliding into third base yesterday and the Reds announced that he’ll undergo surgery tomorrow to repair torn cartilage.

There’s no official timetable for his return yet, but the Reds placed Ludwick on the disabled list and obviously he’s going to be out for a while.

Chris Heisey is the obvious fill in, although if Ludwick’s injury keeps him out for months rather than weeks the Reds could eventually turn to top prospect Billy Hamilton in center field, with Shin-Soo Choo shifting to left field.

For now though Hamilton is at Triple-A, making life miserable for International League catchers, and Heisey will get a chance to play regularly after hitting .258 with a .750 OPS in 338 games as a part-timer during the past three seasons.

Ludwick had a big bounceback year in 2012, hitting .275 with 26 homers and an .877 OPS, and then re-signed with the Reds for $15 million over two seasons.

UPDATE: Bob Nightengale of USA Today reports that Ludwick is expected to miss three months.

The Angels are giving managerial candidates a two-hour written test

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Jon Morosi of MLB.com reports that the Los Angeles Angels are administering a two-hour written test to managerial candidates. The test presents “questions spanning analytical, interpersonal and game-management aspects of the job,” according to Morosi.

I can’t find any reference to it, but I remember another team doing some form of written testing for managerial candidates within the past couple of years. Questions which presented tactical dilemmas, for example. I don’t recall it being so intense, however. And then, as now, I have a hard time seeing experienced candidates wanting to sit for a two-hour written exam when their track record as a manager, along with an interview to assess compatibility should cover most of it. Just seems like an extension of the current trend in which front offices are taking away authority and, with this, some measure of professional respect, from managers.