CC Sabathia downplays concerns over diminished velocity

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CC Sabathia allowed four runs on eight hits and four walks over five innings in today’s season-opening 8-2 loss to the Red Sox. In doing so, the big southpaw topped out at just 91.7 mph on his fastball (according to Brooks Baseball) and relied heavily on his changeup to get outs. However, he told Mark Feinsend of the New York Daily News that he’s not concerned about the radar gun right now.

“I feel good. The arm strength will be building up as the season goes on but health wise I feel fine. I’ll keep working in the bullpen and just try to get better.

“I’m sure that the velocity will keep coming back and the arm strength will keep building up the more I throw. Health-wise, I feel fine, elbow, shoulder and everything. It’s just time I guess to build the arm strength back up.

“It’s always what it is at the beginning of the year, 88 to 92. That’s what I’ll work with right now and hopefully it gets a little better.”

Sabathia, 32, averaged 92.3 mph on his heater last season and 93.8 mph in 2011. To be fair, he is coming off elbow surgery and is typically a slow starter, so it’s probably way too soon to panic. But his velocity figures to be a prominent topic of conversation during his upcoming starts.

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Behold: The new Marlins logo

Marlins
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The Marlins have not released their new uniform design — at least not yet — but they did release their new logo today. That’s it up top. It’s not too bad? Here’s the secondary logo, which you could maybe imagine on a cap?

The logo appears at the end of the video below which is, until the final few seconds, not about baseball at all. It’s about Miami. A “this is our town” promotional thing which takes you on a tour and shows you people and the culture of the city.

A lot of times when sports teams do this stuff it seems somewhat contrived, but I think it’s pretty cool here. The Marlins have almost never sent much of a “we are a part of our community” message. Jeff Loria lived in New York for Pete’s sake and, of course, they infamously consider themselves a foreign corporation for legal purposes. Before this, the most they ever seemed to want out of Miami is tax subsidies and to be left the hell alone.

You can’t just market your way into a community — and the Marlins have a long way to go before they can earn back any sort of trust from baseball fans in Miami —  but the fact that they are at least trying to make themselves part of the Miami community is probably worth something.

Anyway: