Jim Riggleman: paying the price for quitting

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Jorge Arangure of Sports on Earth caught up with Jim Riggleman recently. Riggleman is entering his second straight season as a minor league manager. And the reason he’s in the minor leagues is because he quit on the Washington Nationals in 2011, and as Arangure notes, baseball will forgive anything but someone who just ups and quits. Ask Mike Hargrove.

Riggleman, however, doesn’t sound like he regrets much:

“As I’ve told many people, it wasn’t the smart thing to do,” Riggleman said. “But it was thought out and it had been going for awhile, but it wasn’t the smart decision. But I thought it was the right decision. That’s the consequences sometimes. Things don’t work out perfectly as you hope. I got to live with my decision.”

I wonder if Riggleman’s fate would have been all that different if he had done the smart thing and let his contract run out with the Nationals where, no, I don’t think anyone was going to renew it. As the article notes, Riggleman was never seen by anyone as the guy to take a team to the next level. And while he has always done admirable service as a guy to take a team that is down its luck and be, well, a placeholder until it is better, those jobs don’t keep coming forever.  How many managers who fill that role get more than four chances to do it? We’re in an age now where teams are taking chances on ex-players with virtually no high-level managing or coaching experience like Mike Redmond and Walt Weiss. It’s possible that Riggleman’s path would have played out exactly like this had he not quit.

All that aside, it’s a good article about a — by all reports — good guy who made one strange and unexpected decision a couple of years ago.

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

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Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?