Josh Thole sent down to Triple-A

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I normally wouldn’t do a post about a guy losing a backup catcher competition, but this one is notable because he was supposed to be an extra special backup catcher: the Blue Jays have sent Josh Thole down to the minors.

Many thought the whole point of the Mets including Thole in the deal that sent R.A. Dickey to Toronto was so that he could be Dickey’s personal catcher. You know, because knuckleballers are so erratic and need a special guy around.  Maybe the height of this was when The Red Sox took such efforts to get Doug Mirabelli back from the Padres in 2006, after Tim Wakefield had to go without his special services behind the plate for almost a whole month. Mirabelli had a friggin’ police escort to Fenway Park he was so important.

But there are apparently limits to what a team will do for a knuckleballer’s special friend, and carrying Thole’s bat is the limit. Thole hit just .234/.294/.290 last year and was doing even worse this spring for his new club. It appears as though Henry Blanco who, conservatively, has been catching 142 years, will get the backup job.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.