All quiet on the Biogenesis lawsuit front

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Major League Baseball filed the lawsuit against Biogenesis on Friday. My view is that it’s a ridiculous, meritless claim asserted solely for the purposes of obtaining documents, not vindicating any actual legal rights.

My view of that is that is based on a legal analysis of the claim, the lack of a damages case and my understanding of the nature of the Joint Drug Agreement which baseball says Biogenesis interfered with. But sometimes analogies work way better. I like this one from a Roger Abrams in this Reuters analysis of the suit:

Roger Abrams, a sports law professor at Northeastern University in Boston, used the example of player contracts that call for the player to hit specific weight targets in spring training.

“Does that mean you can sue McDonald’s for selling Big Macs to this guy?” he said.

Hey, at least a team could hope to recover something from McDonalds if they were successful.

In other news, when the Miami New Times story first came out a couple of months ago, Mike Lupica and a host of other sportswriters hastily wrote angry columns saying that, boy oh boy, if only Major League Baseball could get people under oath this thing would be blown wide open. Since Friday, however, I’ve been unable to find any columns or commentary from the usual suspects lauding Major League Baseball for its lawsuit.

What’s up guys? Wasn’t this what you wanted? Or were you just being angry then and hadn’t yet thought out the end game?

Max Scherzer, with broken nose, strikes out 10 Phillies over seven shutout innings

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Nationals starter Max Scherzer bunted a ball into his face during batting practice on Tuesday, breaking his nose in the process. He ended up with a gnarly looking shiner around his right eye, making him appear a bit like Terminator. Scherzer still took the ball to start the second game of Wednesday night’s doubleheader against the Phillies.

Despite the injury, Scherzer was incredibly effective, limiting the Phillies to four hits and two walks across seven shutout innings, striking out 10 batters in the process. He might even have had some extra adrenaline going, as he averaged 96.2 MPH on his fastball, his highest average fastball velocity in a game since September 2012, per MLB.com’s Jamal Collier. The Nationals provided Scherzer with just one run of support, coming on a Brian Dozier solo home run off of Jake Arrieta in the second inning, but it was enough.

Wander Suero worked a scoreless top of the eighth with a pair of strikeouts. Victor Robles added a solo homer off of Pat Neshek in the bottom half. Closer Sean Doolittle took over in the ninth, working a 1-2-3 frame to give the Nats their 2-0 victory.

Over his last six starts, Scherzer now has a 0.88 ERA with a 59/8 K/BB ratio across 41 innings. He has gone six innings, struck out at least nine batters, and held the opposition to two or fewer runs in each of those six starts.