All quiet on the Biogenesis lawsuit front

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Major League Baseball filed the lawsuit against Biogenesis on Friday. My view is that it’s a ridiculous, meritless claim asserted solely for the purposes of obtaining documents, not vindicating any actual legal rights.

My view of that is that is based on a legal analysis of the claim, the lack of a damages case and my understanding of the nature of the Joint Drug Agreement which baseball says Biogenesis interfered with. But sometimes analogies work way better. I like this one from a Roger Abrams in this Reuters analysis of the suit:

Roger Abrams, a sports law professor at Northeastern University in Boston, used the example of player contracts that call for the player to hit specific weight targets in spring training.

“Does that mean you can sue McDonald’s for selling Big Macs to this guy?” he said.

Hey, at least a team could hope to recover something from McDonalds if they were successful.

In other news, when the Miami New Times story first came out a couple of months ago, Mike Lupica and a host of other sportswriters hastily wrote angry columns saying that, boy oh boy, if only Major League Baseball could get people under oath this thing would be blown wide open. Since Friday, however, I’ve been unable to find any columns or commentary from the usual suspects lauding Major League Baseball for its lawsuit.

What’s up guys? Wasn’t this what you wanted? Or were you just being angry then and hadn’t yet thought out the end game?

Tyler Glasnow scheduled to rejoin Rays’ rotation

Jonathan Dyer-USA TODAY Sports
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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Tampa Bay Rays right-hander Tyler Glasnow is scheduled to rejoin the rotation at Cleveland after missing nearly 14 months because of Tommy John surgery.

The Rays’ Opening Day starter last year hasn’t pitched this season after undergoing the procedure on Aug. 4, 2021.

“I think we’re pretty confident he’ll be starting for us,” Tampa Bay manager Kevin Cash said before the game with Toronto. “This is the first time he’s thrown pain-free in quite some time, so he’s encouraged by it.”

The 6-foot-8 right-hander went 5-2 with a 2.66 ERA in 14 starts last year and is a key addition as the Rays near a wild-card spot.

“Compared to the past, like, three years it feels way better as far as postday and the week leading into starts and stuff,” Glasnow said. “It’s good to have an UCL, you know.”

Cash said Glasnow will throw around 45 pitches in his initial outing, which should allow him to go two or three innings.

“Two innings of Glasnow is still a huge plus for our team,” Cash said. “Like to get three innings. If we do, great. If we don’t, that’s fine, too.”

Glasnow allowed one run, one hit, four walks and had 14 strikeouts over seven innings in four starts with Triple-A Durham.

“I’m really excited,” Glasnow said. “I’m approaching it like normal, staying on routine. Feels normal.”

Glasnow signed a two-year, $30.35 million contract that will delay the start of his free agency by one year last month. He’s making $5.1 million this year and will get $5.35 million next season and $25 million in 2024, which is the first year he would have been eligible for free agency.