Jesus Montero exits game after being hit in head by backswing

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UPDATE: Good news. Mariners general manager Jack Zduriencik told Geoff Baker of the Seattle Times that Montero does not have a concussion.

5:01 PM: Scary moment in this afternoon’s Cactus League game between the Mariners and Indians.

According to Geoff Baker of the Seattle Times, Mariners catcher Jesus Montero made an early exit after he was hit in the head by the backswing of Indians prospect shortstop Francisco Lindor. He was down on the ground for a few moments before getting to his feet and being carted off to the clubhouse. Baker notes that he looked “woozy” and had a big lump on his forehead.

Montero will presumably be sent for tests to rule out a possible concussion. It’s worth noting that he suffered a concussion last July when he took a foul tip off his facemask.

If Montero it turns out that he needs a stint on the disabled list, Kelly Shoppach would serve as the starting catcher. Baker speculates that the Mariners would likely carry Jesus Sucre as a backup, but they would have to add him to the 40-man roster.

Mariano Rivera elected to Baseball Hall of Fame unanimously

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Former Yankees closer Mariano Rivera deservingly became the first player ever inducted into the Hall of Fame unanimously, receiving votes from all 425 writers who submitted ballots. Previously, the closest players to unanimous induction were Ken Griffey, Jr. (99.32% in 2016), Tom Seaver (98.84% in 1992), Nolan Ryan (98.79% in 1999), Cal Ripken, Jr. (98.53%), Ty Cobb (98.23% in 1936), and George Brett (98.19% in 1999).

Because so many greats were not enshrined in Cooperstown unanimously, many voters in the past argued against other players getting inducted unanimously, withholding their votes for otherwise deserving players. That Griffey — both one of the greatest outfielders of all time and one of the most popular players of all time — wasn’t voted in unanimously in 2016, for example, seemed to signal that no player ever would. Now that Rivera has been, this tired argument about voting unanimity can be laid to rest.

Derek Jeter will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot for the first time next year. He may become the second player ever to be elected unanimously. David Ortiz appears on the 2022 ballot and could be No. 3. Now that Rivera has broken through, these are possibilities whereas before they might not have been.

Another tired argument around Hall of Fame voting concerns whether or not a player is a “first ballot” Hall of Famer. Some voters think getting enshrined in a player’s first year of eligibility is a greater honor than getting in any subsequent year. I’m not sure what it will take to get rid of this argument — other than the electorate getting younger and more open-minded — but at least we have made progress on at least one bad Hall of Fame take.