The Yankees sue StubHub over store near Yankee Stadium

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Last month the Yankees and Angels opted-out of the resale arrangement the 28 other teams have with StubHub. This came after years of acrimony between the Yankees and StubHub over what the Yankees perceive to be StubHub undercutting the team by selling tickets lower than the Yankees box office. Never mind that the Yankees had already sold those tickets to whoever was putting them on StubHub and never mind that the market pretty much dictates what people will pay for tickets and the Yankees couldn’t be bothered to listen.

Now the acrimony is higher as Eric Fisher of Sports Business Journal reports that the Yankees have sued StubHub over what may or may not be a StubHub retail store near Yankee Stadium. I say “may or may not” because what, exactly, that StubHub storefront near the ballpark is depends on your point of view.

The Yankees say it’s a ticket resale store and that its presence less than 1,500 feet of a sports venue violates New York scalping laws. StubHub counters, saying no, it’s just a place were people on their way to a game can print out and pick up their tickets which were purchased online. Those sets of competing interpretations are the stuff of litigation, my friends.

And, with the caveat of me not knowing a thing about this particular law or the facts giving rise to this dispute, I will offer that courts frequently look askance at efforts to circumvent an existing law with what can only be described as cuteness. And this, however clever, does seem a bit too cute.

But obviously that’s for the courts to decide. And now they’re getting their chance.

White Sox trying to trade Avasail Garcia

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A wise man once said that a wise mad said that you miss 100% of the shots you don’t take. The White Sox are not prepared to miss their shot: Mark Feinsand of MLB.com says they are “actively trying” to trade Avisail Garcia.

Which seems like a super difficult shot given that (a) Garcia had knee and hamstring injuries this past season; (b) hit just .236/.281/.438 when he did play; and (c) is arbitration eligible and stands to make more than the $6.7 million salary he made in 2018. You put those things together and you have a guy that the Sox are almost 100% going to non-tender rather than take to arbitration, thereby making him freely and cheaply available to anyone who wants him as long as they can wait until November 30, which is the tender/non-tender deadline.

Garcia, who somehow is still just 27 years-old, is one year removed from what many considered a breakout year, in which he hit .330/.380/.506 in 136 games, but I don’t think anyone is going to bite at him in a trade. Assuming he’s in decent shape and recovered from injuries, however, he could be a useful player in 2019.