David Wright has no regrets about playing in the WBC

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David Wright reported back to Mets camp on Sunday morning and offered some perspective for those wanting to blame the World Baseball Classic on his back injury. ESPN New York’s Adam Rubin has the message:

“You can get hurt in spring training,” the third baseman said. “You can get hurt before spring training. Playing baseball, there’s some risk that comes along with that, whether it’s in Port St. Lucie or Arizona or Miami. … Unfortunately things like that happen. It has nothing to do with the tournament itself. It has everything to do with some bad luck.”

Wright was given a cortisone shot Friday at the Hospital for Special Surgery in Manhattan. He can’t say for sure whether he’s going to be able to be a member of the Mets’ starting lineup on Opening Day.

“It’s not nearly as bad as it was,” Wright told reporters on Sunday. “I can definitely feel it.”

The 30-year-old batted .438/.526/.750 with 10 RBI in four World Baseball Classic games.

Marlins designate Derek Dietrich for assignment

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The Marlins designated utilityman Derek Dietrich for assignment, Clark Spencer of the Miami Herald reports. This comes amid a flurry of moves on Tuesday night as teams prepare their rosters ahead of the Rule 5 draft next month.

Dietrich, 29, is coming off another strong season in which he hit .265/.330/.421 with 16 home runs, 45 RBI, and 72 runs scored in 551 plate appearances. He played all over the diamond, spending most of his time in left field and at first base. Dietrich also played some second base, third base, and right field.

Dietrich is entering his third of four years of arbitration eligibility. He earned $2.9 million this past season and MLB Trade Rumors projects him to earn $4.8 million in 2019. Cutting Dietrich represents a bit more than 4 million in savings for the rebuilding and perennially small-market Marlins. Dietrich should draw some interest, so the Marlins could end up trading him rather soon.

Wonder how J.T. Realmuto, now the longest-tenured Marlin, is feeling right about now.