Aroldis Chapman wants to close

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Perhaps the biggest debate of the off-season, at least after the AL MVP award was handed out, was the benefit or detriment of the Reds’ desire to move Aroldis Chapman to the starting rotation. Chapman, behind a high-90’s fastball, finished the 2012 season with a 1.51 ERA and 38 saves. However, the Reds signed Jonathan Broxton, giving them the flexibility to push Chapman into the rotation.

Here’s the latest wrench in the whole debacle. Chapman says he wants to close, according to Danny Knobler:

What was perhaps most interesting about the day was how strongly Chapman spoke when asked what he wants the Reds’ decision to be.

“I would like to be a closer, but that’s not in my hands,” Chapman said.

General manager Walt Jocketty and pitching coach Bryan Price have favored making Chapman a starter, while Baker has been considered the strongest advocate of leaving him in the bullpen.

The Reds are expected to decide in the next few days what Chapman’s role in 2013 will be, closing or starting. He tossed four innings in his most recent spring training outing, but his spring training use is no indicator of his regular season use as he was worked as a starter last spring as well.

Twins to retire Joe Mauer’s No. 7

AP Photo/Jim Mone
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Twins senior director of communications Dustin Morse announced that the Twins will honor former C/1B Joe Mauer by retiring his uniform number 7. Mauer announced his retirement from baseball on November 9.

Mauer will join Harmon Killebrew (No. 3), Tony Oliva (No. 6), Tom Kelly (No. 10), Kent Hrbek (No. 14), Rod Carew (No. 29), Kirby Pucket (No. 34), and Bert Blyleven (No. 28) as Twins to have their numbers retired.

Mauer, 35, spent 15 seasons in the majors, all with the Twins. He posted a career .306/.388/.439 triple-slash line with 143 home runs and 923 RBI. He won the AL MVP Award in 2009, won the batting title three times, earned three Gold Gloves and five Silver Sluggers, and made the AL All-Star team six times. Sadly, his career was limited due to injuries, including a concussion that caused him to move from catcher to first base.

Five years from now, Mauer will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot. There will certainly be some arguments for and against his candidacy. He retired with 55.1 career Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference, which definitely puts him in the conversation. But, as always, there’s never a consensus.