The Miami New Times will not hand over the Biogenesis files to Major League Baseball … because of Jeffrey Loria

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The Miami New Times has realized that Major League Baseball is a business, not an arm of the government, and has decided not to hand over the records of the Biogenesis clinic to the league. But the best part of it all is one of the reasons: Jeff Loria.

The New Times — perhaps a little self-servingly, given that they have ripped Loria often in the past — details Loria’s history of mismanagement and bad deeds, notes that Bud Selig is supposed to act in the best interests of baseball, and that he has nonetheless enabled Loria for over a decade. They go on:

So this is the guy who wants our records? Isn’t he the same commissioner who in 2002 approved the complicated deal that gave Loria the Marlins, betrayed the City of Montreal, and caused Loria’s partners to accuse the artful merchant of racketeering? … he represents an organization with a long history of getting things wrong …

The New Times goes on to cite every transgression in baseball history — from the Black Sox on down — and says Major League Baseball is responsible. Then notes, specifically, that Selig was on watch while steroids flourished in baseball and guys like Mark McGwire continue to allowed to be part of the game, and worries that Selig may misuse the records to hand out uneven discipline or the like.

It’s all rather amusing, actually, even if the justifications for not handing them over which are attributable to baseball’s misdeeds are all over the map (really? Selig has to pay for the Black Sox scandal and segregation now?). And even if later in the editorial the New Times notes that the real reasons were journalistic ethics, worry about future leakers having their info and identity disseminated against their will and — this seems like the biggest reason — there is an ongoing state investigation into Anthony Bosch that the New Times feel will be imperiled if they hand over records to anyone else.

The important thing here, I think, is the result. It’s just bad form for a newspaper to hand over its investigative records to some private business. One which clearly has a conflict of interest to boot. So even if the New Times’ reasoning here is all rather, well, odd and funny, the right decision was reached.

Royals fire manager Mike Matheny after 65-97 end to season

Minnesota Twis v Kansas City Royals
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KANSAS CITY, Mo. – Manager Mike Matheny and pitching coach Cal Eldred were fired by the Kansas Cty Royals on Wednesday night, shortly after the struggling franchise finished the season 65-97 with a listless 9-2 loss to the Cleveland Guardians.

The Royals had exercised their option on Matheny’s contract for 2023 during spring training, when the club hoped it was turning the corner from also-ran to contender again. But plagued by poor pitching, struggles from young position players and failed experiments with veterans, the Royals were largely out of playoff contention by the middle of summer.

The disappointing product led owner John Sherman last month to fire longtime front office executive Dayton Moore, the architect of back-to-back American League champions and the 2015 World Series title team. Moore was replaced by one of his longtime understudies, J.J. Picollo, who made the decision to fire Matheny hours after the season ended.

Matheny became the fifth big league manager to be fired this year.

Philadelphia’s Joe Girardi was replaced on June 3 by Rob Thomson, who engineered a miraculous turnaround to get the Phillies into the playoffs as a wild-card team. The Angels replaced Joe Maddon with Phil Nevin four days later, Toronto’s Charlie Montoyo was succeeded by John Schneider on July 13 and the Rangers’ Chris Woodward by Tony Beasley on Aug. 15.

In addition, Miami’s Don Mattingly said late last month that he will not return next season.