Vin Scully called Game 7 of the World Series and then went on a date with “Sesame Street” creator

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Vin Scully is set to begin his 64th season announcing Dodgers games and the greatest broadcaster in baseball history shared a lot of great stuff during an interview with Lyle Spencer of MLB.com.

My favorite part, which Jon Weisman of the must-read Dodger Thoughts alerted me to, is that on the night the Dodgers won Game 7 of the World Series in 1955 a then 28-year-old Scully’s postgame plans involved going out on a date:

I had a date, and I left the group to get my car and go pick her up. We drove over to Brooklyn for the party at the Bossert Hotel. It was like V-J Day and V-E Day rolled into one when we came out of the tunnel. There were thousands of people on the sidewalks leading to the hotel. There were policemen, and parking attendants who took your car about a block from the hotel. Walking down that street to the hotel, that was an unforgettable scene.

Her name was Joan Ganz. She was from Arizona. I’m pretty sure she later became the creator of “Sesame Street.” You can check on that. We liked each other and stayed in touch, but it never got serious. I haven’t told this story, but what the heck. That was a long time ago.

First of all, as you’d expect Scully’s memory is spot on. Joan Ganz (who later became Joan Ganz Cooney) created “Sesame Street.” She also was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Hall of Fame. Oh, and she won a Presidential Medal of Freedom too. She’s probably one of the most influential people in television history.

Imagine how many incredible stories Vin Scully has that makes “I once dated the woman who created ‘Sesame Street’ after calling Game 7 of the 1955 World Series” not even worth telling for 58 years.

“I haven’t told this story, but what the heck.”

Phillies’ Bryce Harper to miss start of season after elbow surgery

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PHILADELPHIA – Phillies slugger Bryce Harper will miss the start of the 2023 season after he had reconstructive right elbow surgery.

The operation was performed by Dr. Neal ElAttrache in Los Angeles.

Harper is expected to return to Philadelphia’s lineup as the designated hitter by the All-Star break. He could be back in right field by the end of the season, according to the team.

The 30-year-old Harper suffered a small ulnar collateral ligament tear in his elbow in April. He last played right field at Miami on April 16. He had a platelet-rich plasma injection in May and shifted to designated hitter.

Harper met Nov. 14 with ElAttrache, who determined the tear did not heal on its own, necessitating surgery.

Even with the elbow injury, Harper led the Phillies to their first World Series since 2009, where they lost in six games to Houston. He hit .349 with six homers and 13 RBIs in 17 postseason games.

In late June, Harper suffered a broken thumb when he was hit by a pitch and was sidelined for two months. The two-time NL MVP still hit .286 with 18 homers and 65 RBIs for the season.

Harper left Washington and signed a 13-year, $330 million contract with the Phillies in 2019. A seven-time All-Star, Harper has 285 career home runs.

With Harper out, the Phillies could use Nick Castellanos and Kyle Schwarber at designated hitter. J.T. Realmuto also could serve as the DH when he needs a break from his catching duties.