Brian Cashman would really like Chipper Jones to come out of retirement

38 Comments

Chipper Jones is retired. He has said so unequivocally and repeatedly, as recently as two weeks ago. Still, when you’re Brian Cashman and you’ve lost your third baseman, first baseman and one of your corner outfielders I suppose you’re allowed to be hopeful about things:

Those first two tweets sounded like Cashman — who was speaking to reporters about his Derek Lee inquiries — just messing around. In the same vein as “sure, I’d love it if we could sign Johnny Mize.”  But the last one suggesting that Cashman is serious was somewhat surprising.

It’s not going to happen. Chipper Jones is not, by his own admission, at all interested in playing baseball anymore. Even if he was, there is nothing in his entire history or temperament which suggests he’d go back on his decision to retire, let alone that he’d do so for the Yankees or any other team besides the Braves.

UPDATE: It seems Cashman has reached out to Scott Rolen too, but there isn’t much traction there.  No word on when Kelly Gruber will get his call.

But when you’re desperate you’re desperate. And if I was Brian Cashman I’d want Chipper Jones too.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.