Ned Yost is taking spring training very seriously

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Pete Grathoff’s article in the Kansas City Star is mostly about how the Royals are giving infielders Chris Getz and Johnny Giavotella some reps in the outfield to increase their versatility, but buried within that is this little tidbit and quote from manager Ned Yost:

This was going to happen earlier, but the Royals were just playing too well. …

“It’s not an experiment, but we want guys to be versatile, and those guys, we think, can handle it,” Yost said before Thursday’s 12-2 loss to the Mariners. “I was waiting until we lost a game before I started experimenting a little bit, but what the hell, we’d better just go ahead and start doing it.”

He means a spring training game, just to be clear. As in, Yost didn’t want to start giving players action at new positions while the team was on a spring training winning streak in early March. Kansas City is an MLB-best 11-1 this spring, but based on how seriously they’re apparently taking Cactus League wins and losses Royals fans might be getting set up for disappointment once the games actually count.

If you’re curious, last year’s best spring training record belonged to the Blue Jays at 24-7 and they went 73-89 in the regular season. And two years ago the Royals–with Yost as their manager–had the best spring training winning percentage and they went 71-91.

Might as well do whatever you want in spring training games, because the wins and losses don’t really matter.

MLBPA proposes 114-game season, playoff expansion to MLB

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ESPN’s Jeff Passan reports that the Major League Baseball Players Association has submitted a proposal to the league concerning the 2020 season. The proposal includes a 114-game season with an end date on October 31, playoff expansion for two years, the right for players to opt out of the season, and a potential deferral of 2020 salaries if the postseason were to be canceled.

Passan clarifies that among the players who choose to opt out, only those that are considered “high risk” would still receive their salaries. The others would simply receive service time. The union also proposed that the players receive a non-refundable $100 million sum advance during what would essentially be Spring Training 2.

If the regular season were to begin in early July, as has often been mentioned as the target, that would give the league four months to cram in 114 games. There would have to be occasional double-headers, or the players would have to be okay with few off-days. Nothing has been mentioned about division realignment or a geographically-oriented schedule, but those could potentially ease some of the burden.

Last week, the owners made their proposal to the union, suggesting a “sliding scale” salary structure. The union did not like that suggestion. Players were very vocal about it, including on social media as Max Scherzer — one of eight players on the union’s executive subcommittee — made a public statement. The owners will soon respond to the union’s proposal. They almost certainly won’t be happy with many of the details, but the two sides can perhaps find a starting point and bridge the gap. As the calendar turns to June, time is running out for the two sides to hammer out an agreement on what a 2020 season will look like.