As if you needed another reason to hate Alex Rodriguez

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The Boston Globe has a feature on the non-profit foundations set up by athletes, and as one might expect, some do a better job of funneling money to their stated missions than others do.

One, though, stands apart and might even be considered a fraud:

A foundation started by New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez gave only 1 percent of proceeds to charity during its first year of operation in 2006, then stopped submitting mandatory financial reports to the IRS and was stripped of its tax-exempt status. Yet the group’s website still tells visitors the A-Rod Family Foundation is a nonprofit organization.

That website, hosted by MLB.com, remains active, though the latest news is from Sept. 5, 2007.  It should be noted that while nothing suggests the Foundation has been shut down, there’s no apparent way to donate to it on the webpage. There’s also no link back to the foundation on Rodriguez’s official homepage. And given that Alex’s ex-wife, Cynthia, is featured prominently as part of the Foundation’s website, one assumes that if A-Rod does decide to jump back into the charity business, he’ll be coming up with something completely new.

The Boston Globe’s reporting also suggests that the foundations of Josh Beckett and ex-Patriots receiver Deion Branch weren’t very efficient, while those set up by Curt Schilling and 49ers quarterback Alex Smith did a better job of making sure what they took in got into the proper hands.

Report: Pirates to convert JB Shuck into two-way player

JB Shuck
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Rob Biertempfel of The Athletic reports that the Pirates have decided to convert outfielder JB Shuck into a two-way player. Recent comments relayed from the club’s director of player development, Larry Broadway, indicated that the outfielder would be coached in developing his pitching skills while working at Triple-A Indianapolis.

Per Broadway, the change would be enacted to help the veteran outfielder develop some much-needed versatility in the majors, where he’s only ever been limited to outfield and DH responsibilities. Well, except for the two games in which he pitched an inning of relief: once, against the Nationals in a blowout 11-4 loss in 2016, then in a similarly painful loss to the Diamondbacks this past April. During the latter outing, he finished the game with a 13-pitch ninth inning after allowing just one hit and one walk.

Add to that one minor-league outing in 2012, and the 31-year-old Shuck has pitched just three times over the course of his 12-season career in pro ball. While he has three years of experience on the mound from his college days, he’ll need quite a bit of preparation to handle the kind of workload expected from a two-way outfielder/reliever: 20+ innings pitched over a season and 20+ games played as a designated hitter or position player.

Still, his lack of experience doesn’t seem to faze Broadway, at least not this early in the process. There’s no word yet on how soon Shuck would be expected to debut his new skillset on a major-league level.