As if you needed another reason to hate Alex Rodriguez

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The Boston Globe has a feature on the non-profit foundations set up by athletes, and as one might expect, some do a better job of funneling money to their stated missions than others do.

One, though, stands apart and might even be considered a fraud:

A foundation started by New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez gave only 1 percent of proceeds to charity during its first year of operation in 2006, then stopped submitting mandatory financial reports to the IRS and was stripped of its tax-exempt status. Yet the group’s website still tells visitors the A-Rod Family Foundation is a nonprofit organization.

That website, hosted by MLB.com, remains active, though the latest news is from Sept. 5, 2007.  It should be noted that while nothing suggests the Foundation has been shut down, there’s no apparent way to donate to it on the webpage. There’s also no link back to the foundation on Rodriguez’s official homepage. And given that Alex’s ex-wife, Cynthia, is featured prominently as part of the Foundation’s website, one assumes that if A-Rod does decide to jump back into the charity business, he’ll be coming up with something completely new.

The Boston Globe’s reporting also suggests that the foundations of Josh Beckett and ex-Patriots receiver Deion Branch weren’t very efficient, while those set up by Curt Schilling and 49ers quarterback Alex Smith did a better job of making sure what they took in got into the proper hands.

Max Scherzer, with broken nose, strikes out 10 Phillies over seven shutout innings

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Nationals starter Max Scherzer bunted a ball into his face during batting practice on Tuesday, breaking his nose in the process. He ended up with a gnarly looking shiner around his right eye, making him appear a bit like Terminator. Scherzer still took the ball to start the second game of Wednesday night’s doubleheader against the Phillies.

Despite the injury, Scherzer was incredibly effective, limiting the Phillies to four hits and two walks across seven shutout innings, striking out 10 batters in the process. He might even have had some extra adrenaline going, as he averaged 96.2 MPH on his fastball, his highest average fastball velocity in a game since September 2012, per MLB.com’s Jamal Collier. The Nationals provided Scherzer with just one run of support, coming on a Brian Dozier solo home run off of Jake Arrieta in the second inning, but it was enough.

Wander Suero worked a scoreless top of the eighth with a pair of strikeouts. Victor Robles added a solo homer off of Pat Neshek in the bottom half. Closer Sean Doolittle took over in the ninth, working a 1-2-3 frame to give the Nats their 2-0 victory.

Over his last six starts, Scherzer now has a 0.88 ERA with a 59/8 K/BB ratio across 41 innings. He has gone six innings, struck out at least nine batters, and held the opposition to two or fewer runs in each of those six starts.