Mike Schmidt is not yet convinced that Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens took steroids

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Mike Schmidt says an awful lot I agree with in this interview with Jim Salisbury of CSNPhilly.com.  He doesn’t like it when people are accused of using PEDs without evidence and he hates the guilt-by-association that is so common when the topic comes up. What’s more, he has no problem with Barry Bonds or Roger Clemens being in the Hall of Fame.

Yep, we’re really on the same page here. But I don’t think even I’d go this far:

“I would not have a problem with Bonds or Clemens,” Schmidt said at Phillies camp. “Here we are convicting them of PED use and we don’t know anything more than we read.”

Schmidt said he’d need to see “a legitimate failed test” to bar a player from election to the Hall of Fame.

“I don’t think anyone that failed a legitimate test should be in,” Schmidt said. “But I’d need to see a legitimate test to know if what we’re talking about was actual fact.”

I’ve read Game of Shadows. I think it’s safe to say that Barry Bonds took steroids, and I think we can say so without a test result.  Clemens may be a bit more dicey, but I don’t think I’d choose to die on Roger Clemens Didn’t Take Steroids Hill in these PED battles we tend to have.

But really, I’d rather err on the side Schmidt is erring on than to fall in with the “eyeball test” crowd.

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

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Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.