Red Sox could save $2.2 million by releasing Alfredo Aceves

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Alfredo Aceves is doing his best to build a terrible relationship with a second straight Red Sox manager, but so far at least there are no reports of Boston being fed up enough to part ways with the reliever.

However, like all arbitration-eligible players who signed one-year deals to avoid a hearing Aceves’ contract is not fully guaranteed.

If released by March 13 the Red Sox would owe Aceves just one-sixth of his deal, which would take them off the hook for $2.2 million of his $2.65 million salary. And if the Red Sox waited a little longer and released Aceves by March 27 they’d owe him one-fourth of the money, saving $1.9875 million.

Over the years there are a few cases of a team releasing a signed player under those rules, but it’s definitely not a common occurrence. Sean McAdam of CSNNE.com speculates that trading Aceves is a more likely option because he probably still has enough value to either get something in return or at least shed his entire salary.

Jake Arrieta was not a fan of Bryce Harper’s behavior last night

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As we noted, Bryce Harper was ejected in the Phillies-Mets game for arguing balls and strikes, punctuating the ejection with a fairly aggressive argument in which he sorta shoved his manager into the ump, had to be held back by teammates and may very well have earned himself a suspension.

We’ll see about the suspension part, but even if he didn’t anger Rob Manfred over all of that, he did annoy his teammate, Jake Arrieta, who was on the mound last night. Here were Arrieta’s comments after the game:

“Look, I mean, [Harper’s] got to understand we need him in right field,” Arrieta said. “I don’t care how bad the umpire is. He wasn’t great for either side. I’m out there trying to make pitches, and he misses some calls. So what? We need him out there. I need him in right field, I need him at the plate, and he wasn’t there. So that hurts.

“We were flat from start to finish. Two-hour delay, it doesn’t matter. We have to be ready to play. We weren’t, and it showed. The dugout was flat. The defense wasn’t good. Didn’t throw the ball well as a staff overall. We got beat. We started at 8:45. I don’t think our guys were ready to play. We’ve got to come out tomorrow ready to play.”

For Harper’s part he was contrite after the game, echoing Arrieta’s words about needing to keep a level head and about him being more useful in the game than in the clubhouse. Still, he got told by his teammate. And seems to know he got told.