David Price says he wouldn’t sign with the Yankees because of their facial hair policy

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This will probably set talk radio and the tabloids afire for a day or so, even if it’s pretty meaningless. Here’s David Price, talking to Jon Paul Morosi about the possibility of him being traded by the Rays this year because of approaching free agency:

“If I ever did hit that free-agent market, there would be teams I wouldn’t sign with simply because of the stuff that I’ve heard – every rule they have” … Taking note of his beard, I told Price he’d have to shave if the Yankees traded for him.

“I wouldn’t stay there very long then,” he responded. “I wouldn’t sign a long-term deal there. Those rules, that’s old-school baseball. I was born in ’85. That’s not for me. That’s not something I want to be a part of.”

I think facial hair policies are silly too. But I’m also pretty sure if the Yankees made Price an offer which was clearly superior to any other teams when he hits free agency, he’d figure out a way to make rules like that work, even if he was born in 1985.

In other news, remember when the Reds had a facial hair policy? They did for years, actually. You know who they scrapped it for: Greg Vaughn of all people. That never ceases to make me smile.

Report: Rays sign Brandon Lowe to six-year, $24 million contract extension

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that the Rays and infielder Brandon Lowe have agreed on a six-year, $24 million contract extension. Lowe has just 58 days of service time, so this will cover his three years of pre-arbitration as well as three arbitration years.

Lowe, 24, earned a promotion to the majors in early August last year, playing mostly at second base but also logging time in both outfield corners. Through the end of the season, he hit .233/.324/.450 with six home runs and 25 RBI in 148 plate appearances. Lowe also performed well this spring, batting .359/.405/.692 with a pair of homers and 14 RBI in 39 at-bats.

MLB Pipeline rates lowe as the No. 10 prospect in the Rays’ system. He is in line to see regular starts at second base, but the Rays will certainly be keen to utilize his versatility throughout the year.