Tom Ricketts is ready to move forward with Wrigley upgrades … if the city will

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We talked a few weeks ago about the Cubs’ new and improved (i.e. privately financed) Wrigley Field renovation plans. Tom Ricketts spoke to MLB.com and it sounds like they’re set to begin. They’re just waiting for city sign-off on the aspects of it that require approval, such as an increase in the number of night games, allowing advertising to block the rooftops across the street and allowing the closing of Sheffield Avenue for weekend games. About all that:

“There’s a lot of things we have to deal with at Wrigley Field that other teams don’t,” Ricketts said on Sunday. “Whether that’s signage restrictions, rooftops, other people selling Cubs gear right outside the park — all of that is great for [the city], but it doesn’t help us. We have to get those resources back into the team so I can give those to [president of baseball operations] Theo [Epstein] to put on the field or to get those resources into improving and preserving the third-largest tourist attraction in the state.”

With all of the time I spend slamming team owners for wanting public handouts, this point, with respect to the Cubs anyway, does get neglected from time to time.  I realize that the Cubs have gotten a lot of goodwill from the rooftops and the neighborhood and things like that — and I know that in recent years the team has even gone into business to some extent with the rooftop owners — but the Cubs are sort of treated like a public good more than other teams are.

What’s more, they’re expected — mostly out of tradition — to give away an awful lot. Views and ticket revenue to the people across the street, nighttime revenue to the bar and restaurant owners.  I don’t think that mandates public financing or anything, but I think it does make their challenges somewhat unique and demands a bit more flexibility on the part of the city so the team can remain competitive.

Report: Orioles expected to replace Buck Showalter

Buck Showalter
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Orioles manager Buck Showalter is not expected to retain his position with the club beyond the 2018 season, according to multiple reports from Jon Heyman of Fancred and Bob Nightengale of USA Today Sports. Nothing appears to be finalized just yet, however, and the Orioles have yet to address rumors of Showalter’s impending departure or news of a possible contract extension for general manager Dan Duquette.

Even so, it’s been a year of near-unprecedented disaster for the 62-year-old skipper, who helped lead the team to a 44-108 record prior to the outcome of Friday’s series opener against the Yankees. With the Orioles’ 108th loss — a 4-6 heartbreaker against the Blue Jays on Tuesday — they tied the 1937 St. Louis Browns for the second-most losses in a single season, eclipsed only by the 43-111 record of the 1939 Browns. As they have just 10 games remaining in the regular season, this year’s team has no chance of climbing out of last place in the AL East and may well finish with the worst record in the AL to boot.

While the Orioles’ missteps don’t bode well for Showalter’s future in Baltimore, he’s brought far more good than harm to the organization over the last eight and a half years. He assumed the managerial position from interim manager Juan Samuel in the middle of the team’s 2010 season and guided the club to five winning seasons and three postseason appearances in 2012, 2014, and 2016. Entering the 2018 season, his record sits at 666 wins and 677 losses, the winningest mark by any of the team’s skippers since Earl Weaver wrapped his 17-season run with the team in 1986. Whether the Orioles believe Showalter is capable of recovering from two consecutive losing seasons and returning the team to their former days of glory (and the occasional division title) remains to be seen, of course, though there’s plenty to recommend him as they prepare to advance a full-scale rebuild over the offseason.