Dusty Baker thinks Clay Hensley pitched in the World Series

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I’ve always been confused by the notion that mediocre players somehow deserve extra credit for being on championship teams, which is a fairly prevalent cliche in all sports.

You’ll see a random role player referred to as “a winner” all the time thanks to his having great teammates–count the ringzzz and all that–but this note about Dusty Baker and the Reds’ bullpen depth from John Fay of the Cincinnati Enquirer takes it to another level:

Baker looked up that roster board in his office. “You’ve a guy up there that pitched in the World Series last year and a guy who almost threw a perfect game on as non-roster players.”

Baker was referring Clay Hensley, who was on the Giants last year, and Armando Galarraga, who just missed a perfect game two years ago.

Clay Hensley had a 4.62 ERA for the Giants last season, allowing 80 baserunners in 51 innings, so the idea that his pitching in the World Series somehow makes him a better player seems absurd. Oh, and also: Clay Hensley did not pitch in the World Series. Or any of the Giants’ playoff games. In fact, they left him off the playoff roster entirely, presumably because he didn’t pitch well.

This isn’t a big deal or anything, obviously, but just saying.

Mariners claim Kaleb Cowart off waivers from Angels

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The Mariners announced that the club claimed Kaleb Cowart off waivers from the Angels. Interestingly, the Mariners list Cowart as both an outfielder and a right-handed pitcher. Cowart has never pitched professionally, but the Mariners will try him as a two-way player next season, Ryan Divish of the Seattle Times reports. Cowart was a highly regarded pitcher in high school.

Cowart, 26, has played all over the field, spending most of his time at third base and second base, but also logging a handful of innings at first base, shortstop, and left field.  He hasn’t hit much at all, owning a career .177/.241/.293 triple-slash line across 380 plate appearances in the big leagues. It makes sense to try another angle.

Shohei Ohtani, of course, is helping to popularize the rebirth of the two-way player. In his first year in the majors after having played in Japan for five years, Ohtani won the AL Rookie of the Year Award by posting a .925 OPS in 367 plate appearances along with a 3.31 ERA over 10 starts. Don’t expect Cowart to hit those lofty numbers, but additional versatility could prolong his life in the majors.