Francisco Cervelli will not play for Italy in the World Baseball Classic

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Francisco Cervelli was listed on Italy’s provisional roster when it was announced last month, but it turns out that he will not participate in the upcoming World Baseball Classic.

According to Bryan Hoch of MLB.com, Cervelli confirmed this morning that he has withdrawn from the tournament. As it stands right now, the 26-year-old projects to share catching duties with Chris Stewart this season, so his first priority is to stay in Yankees’ camp and secure a spot on the Opening Day roster. Italy will push ahead with Twins’ catcher Drew Butera and Giants’ minor league catcher Tyler LaTorre.

Cervelli is currently being investigated by MLB for his alleged ties to the Miami-based Biogenesis clinic and biochemist Anthony Bosch. He admitted earlier this week to meeting with Bosch following a 2011 foot injury, but he maintains that he never received any performance-enhancing drugs.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

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Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.