Kevin Youkilis: “I’ll always be a Red Sock”

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I like this interview with Kevin Youkilis in the Daily News, as he appears totally unwilling to take the bait we usually see laid for new members of the Yankees, especially ones who had a long tenure with another team.

You know the bait I mean: interviews which seem geared toward getting the player to talk about how special it is to be a Yankee and how much different and better and important it is. There’s almost a propaganda aspect to it, actually. The first spring training interview with a new Yankee player is the first chance the tabloids or talk radio get to place the new guy in the True Yankee Continuum.

Here Youkilis, while sounding totally professional about his new team and new challenges, and while handling questions about hot button topics like A-Rod, Joba Chamberlain and The Rivalry, doesn’t lose perspective about his career:

“To negate all the years I played for the Boston Red Sox and all the tradition, you look at all the stuff I have piled up at my house, to say I’d just throw it out the window, that’s not true,” Youkilis said. “I’ll always be a Red Sock.”

It’ll be interesting to watch how the Yankees media reacts to and treats Youkilis this season. I imagine there’s a pretty big temptation to play up the Boston-New York stuff. Maybe even to use this quote against him somehow. But to me it sounds like he’s going to navigate it OK. Neither falling into the Yankees genuflection many expect of new arrivals nor allowing himself to be portrayed as some sort of heel.

Marlins home run sculpture is going, going, gone!

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Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. He simply doesn’t like it aesthetically and many think that, among Jeter’s goals, he’d like to erase any trace of Jeff Loria’s legacy, which includes the sculpture.

The problem: the sculpture is not Jeter’s to remove. The sculpture is public property, purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings, which includes Marlins Park. Miami-Dade officials have said that moving it was not possible as the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed: as it was designed specifically for Marlins Park. And that’s before you get into how logistically complicated it would be to move it. It’s seven stories tall and is connected to a hydraulic system, plumbing and there’s electricity.

What Jeter wants, however, Jeter eventually gets. From the Miami Herald:

The Miami Marlins won county permission on Tuesday to move its home-run sculpture out of Marlins Park to the plaza outside . . . In its new location outside, “Homer” will still turn on for home runs, as well as at the end of every home win and every day at 3:05 p.m., an homage to Miami’s original area code.

It may or may not be moved before Opening Day, but once it is moved there will be a new seating and standing room only area for spectators where the sculpture currently sits.