Was the Red Sox employee who talked to Schilling about PEDs already fired?

12 Comments

UPDATE II: Nick Cafardo of the Boston Globe reports that the person who suggested that Schilling take PEDs was investigated by MLB and cleared. It seems that the individual was eventually fired by the Red Sox, but not for that specific incident.

UPDATE: Pete Abraham has more. And, yes, apparently there was an investigation back in 2008.  Which, OK, we’ll take baseball’s word for that.  Funny, though, that a few short hours ago baseball, when asked, said that it would look into Schilling’s comments and made no mention of an investigation occurring back in 2008.

5:30 PM: Micheal S. Schmidt is hearing so:

Schilling did say that the person was no longer employed by the Red Sox, so that would match.  At the same time, given that Schilling was talking about this person in the context of PEDs in baseball and the league’s response to it, you’d think Schilling would mention that as a means of noting MLB being proactive about such things.

And when he said on Twitter earlier today that he wouldn’t name the person, you’d think that a logical response would be to say “there’s no point in doing so; the person was already fired for it.”  Instead Schilling made it sound like it should all remain hush-hush.

Still, this should be easy to check. Someone with the Red Sox or Major League Baseball should be able to say — and should be willing to say — what Schmidt is saying here. Indeed, since “#thesystemworked” you’d think they’d be proud to say so.

Video: Gleyber Torres slugs a home run in his fourth straight game

AP Images
3 Comments

Yankees rookie second baseman Gleyber Torres has a fun streak going right now: He’s homered in four straight games, becoming the youngest American League player to do so.

The historic knock arrived in the seventh inning of Friday’s series opener against the Angels. With two outs and the bases empty, Torres pounced on a 1-3 fastball from Jim Johnson and posted it to the right field bleachers for a go-ahead run:

It was just the Yankees’ second run of the night (the first having also been provided by Torres on an RBI single in the second inning), but the only one they needed to maintain an edge over the Angels.

Torres, 21, is off to a torrid start this season. Following Saturday’s 2-1 win, he now carries a .333/.393/.646 batting line, nine home runs and a 1.038 OPS through 106 plate appearances. In the past four games alone, he’s gone 7-for-15 with five homers (including a pair of solo shots, a two-run homer and three-run homer) and nine RBI. He’ll have to collect a home run in his next five games if he wants to set a new all-time record, however: Dale Long (1956 Pirates), Don Mattingly (1987 Yankees), and Ken Griffey Jr. (1993 Mariners) currently share the record for the longest home run-hitting streak, at eight games apiece.