Marlins Park may cost less than expected. But Jeff Loria will benefit, not the taxpayers

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Every time I read some new detail about the financing of Marlins Park I find new reason to be gobsmacked at how thoroughly it screws Miami taxpayers. The latest from Charles Rabin of the Miami Herald:

Building the Miami Marlins’ new stadium may end up costing tens of millions of dollars less than planned. And where would the left-over money go? To a maintenance reserve that would save the Marlins from having to dip into their pockets in the future to maintain and repair the stadium.

As the article notes, the norm in baseball is for teams, even those who play in publicly-funded ballparks, to pay for upgrades and upkeep to the park themselves. The Marlins do too, but rather than dip into their own coffers to pay for future upgrades, they’re getting a windfall worth tens of millions of dollars to cushion the blow. Just incredible.

(thanks to Old Gator for the heads up)

Peter Bourjos returns to the Angels on minor league deal

Peter Bourjos
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Free agent outfielder Peter Bourjos is heading back to the Angels on a minor league deal, per a report from Steve Adams of MLB Trade Rumors. The agreement includes an invitation to spring training, but has not yet been officially confirmed by the team.

Bourjos, 31, played out a one-year gig with the Braves in 2018 and slashed .205/.239/.364 with four extra-base hits and a .603 OPS through a career-low 47 plate appearances. He showed more promise during a short-lived stint with the Giants’ Triple-A squad in the second half of the season, but elected free agency in early November and had yet to catch on with another major league club. His deal with the Angels represents a homecoming of sorts, as he played some of the best years of his career in Anaheim from 2010 to 2013 before getting traded to the Cardinals in a multiplayer swap for David Freese and Fernando Salas in 2014.

The veteran outfielder is long past his prime, but could still bring some value to the team as outfield depth behind Justin Upton, Mike Trout, and Kole Calhoun. Per Adams, he’s expected to compete for a spot as the Angels’ fourth outfielder, though he also has limited experience at DH as well.