Stay classy, Mike Lupica

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Mike Lupica brings the class. In his A-Rod column he plays the same “A-Rod just needs to go away” tune as everyone else at the Daily News. Then, when explaining the options the Yankees have, drops this gem about the MLB Players Association:

Or — this appears to be even more of a longshot — they want the commissioner of baseball, Bud Selig, to hit him with a drug suspension so they can start exploring ways to void his contract, even though the Major League Baseball Players Association will fight to protect guaranteed money in baseball the way gun nuts protect their guns.

Get that? A union, whose sole function is to protect the collectively bargained-for rights of its membership, is the equivalent of “gun nuts.”  I’m gonna go on a limb and say, based on past quasi-political things Lupica has written, that he is not exactly the staunchest Second Amendment guy, so in addition to equating the MLBPA to “nuts” he’s probably implicitly saying here that guaranteed contracts are illegitimate and unnecessary.

I also assume that he would be totally cool in giving up some of the money in his contract with the Daily News if he suddenly became unpopular.

Anyway, gotta hand it to the Daily News these past few days. Aside from utterly ignoring reality with respect to A-Rod’s contract situation and being wholly uncritical of their Yankees sources, they have done a bang-up job ratcheting the rhetoric to a ridiculous degree.

Well played, guys. Well played.

Sandy Koufax to be honored with statue at Dodger Stadium

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Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times reports that Hall of Fame pitcher Sandy Koufax will be honored with a statue at Dodger Stadium, expected to be unveiled in 2020. Dodger Stadium will be undergoing major renovations, expected to cost around $100 million, after the season. Koufax’s statue will go in a new entertainment plaza beyond center field. The current statue of Jackie Robinson will be moved into the same area.

Koufax, 83, had a relatively brief career, pitching parts of 12 seasons in the majors, but they were incredible. He was a seven-time All-Star who won the National League Cy Young Award three times (1963, ’65-66) and the NL Most Valuable Player Award once (’63). He contributed greatly to the ’63 and ’65 championship teams and authored four no-hitters, including a perfect game in ’65.

Koufax was also influential in other ways. As Shaikin notes, Koufax refused to pitch Game 1 of the 1965 World Series to observe Yom Kippur. It was an act that would attract national attention and turn Koufax into an American Jewish icon.

Ahead of the 1966 season, Koufax and Don Drysdale banded together to negotiate against the Dodgers, who were trying to pit the pitchers against each other. They sat out spring training, deciding to use their newfound free time to sign  on to the movie Warning Shot. Several weeks later, the Dodgers relented, agreeing to pay Koufax $125,000 and Drysdale $110,000, which was then a lot of money for a baseball player. It would be just a few years later that Curt Flood would challenge the reserve clause. Koufax, Drysdale, and Flood helped the MLB Players Association, founded in 1966, gain traction under the leadership of Marvin Miller.