Sources tell ESPN that Anthony Bosch personally injected A-Rod

37 Comments

Some new details emerging from the Biogenesis story. ESPN’s T.J. Quinn and Mike Fish spoke to a source who claims that Alex Rodriguez got special treatment from the Biogenesis clinic. Owner Anthony Bosch, Quinn and Fish’s source says, would personally go to A-Rod’s Miami home and inject him with HGH.

Bosch and A-Rod have denied everything related to the reports of these past few days, of course. It’s also worth noting that Quinn and Fish’s source tells of a time last year when A-Rod allegedly got mad at Bosch after Bosch “had trouble locating a vein,” despite the fact that HGH injections are not intravenous (Quinn and Fish note this disconnect).

Also of note, no one down in Miami can confirm that the DEA has opened an investigation at all and there is no evidence of an ongoing investigation.  It’s possible that the DEA is just playing it cool and operating with unusual stealthiness.  It’s also possible that, while this is a big story for baseball, the DEA in Miami (or all places) has bigger fish to fry than a now-closed anti-aging clinic.

That part is of some significance. For only the government has subpoena power here. Bud Selig does not.  And if the government is not involved in this, or is not moving particularly quickly, Major League Baseball is unlikely to have more at its disposal than (a) a newspaper report; (b) copies of uncorroborated medical records; and (c) the denials of all the players involved.

If so, could they even suspend these guys on a “just cause” basis pursuant to the Joint Drug Agreement?

Royals to sign Billy Hamilton

Getty Images
Leave a comment

LAS VEGAS — Jim Bowden reports that the Kansas City Royals are close to agreement with outfielder Billy Hamilton. He says they are “just working through bonuses and pending physical.” Hamilton was non-tendered by the Cincinnati Reds a couple of weeks ago following six seasons with the club, making him a free agent.

Hamilton is one of the fastest men to ever play the game, but he has never come around as a hitter. In his six seasons with the Reds he put up a line of .245/.298/.333 (OPS+ 70). While he has stolen 277 bases over that period, getting caught 63 times, he has never once led the league in steals, primarily because he just doesn’t get on base enough. He is an excellent center fielder, but the bat is so sub-par that even the glove and the wheels are not good enough to justify going to arbitration with him.

Perhaps a change of scenery will do him good. He will certainly bring some excitement to Kansas City. He’s a fun guy to watch play.