Baseball cannot, and will not, punish A-Rod any more than any other PED offender

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Tim Keown of ESPN suggests  that Bud Selig should drop the hammer on A-Rod so as to make an example out of him. In his words, to “make an honorary sacrifice” out of him. Among his suggestions:

… could A-Rod be suspended from the game long enough to effectively end his career? Just spitballing here, but could Selig make him the Pete Rose of PEDs and use A-Rod’s arrogant, repeated nose-thumbing of the best interests of the game to make him ineligible for the Hall of Fame? … If he has evidence, he can suspend Rodriguez — or, if you’d prefer, El Cacique — for 50 games or more.

No, he can’t. He can suspend him for 50 games. That’s it.

Yes, we know A-Rod admitted to past PED use in 2009, but he has never before tested positive under the Joint Drug Agreement nor has he previously been subject to discipline. There is nothing more crystal clear than the Joint Drug Agreement’s provision of a 50-game suspension for a first time offender under its auspices.  That is the discipline that Rodriguez is subject to if the allegations in the Miami New Times story are true, and that is the discipline he will receive. Any effort to do more than that will bring about a swift response from the union. It is a battle they would almost certainly win and win easily.

The only thing that makes A-Rod different from Freddy Galvis, Edinson Volquez, J.C. Romero or Dan Serafini is that (a) he makes a lot more money; and (b) a lot of people hate him.  That’s what’s motivating ideas like Keown’s here anyway.  A-Rod’s paycheck and unpoularity, however, does not change the terms of baseball’s Joint Drug Agreement. Please stop suggesting that it does.

Yankees designate Kendrys Morales for assignment

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The New York Yankees have designated Kendrys Morales for assignment.

Morales, 36, hit just .177/.320/.242 with one homer over 19 games with New York. This after he had a disastrous run with the A’s to start the 2019 season, hitting a mere .204/.310/.259 with a lone home run and seven RBI in 126 trips to the plate. Now that Aaron Judge and Giancarlo Stanton are back there’s no room for him anyway, so it kind of doesn’t matter.

Morales had a solid year for the Blue Jays last season, posting a .769 OPS with 21 homers across 130 games, but it’s hard to see him catching on anyplace right now. Indeed, it may be the end of the line for the 13-year veteran.