Great Moments in Health Insurance Claims for Injured Players

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From 2006, regarding Jeff Bagwell:

Attorneys for the Houston Astros filed a lawsuit in state district court here Monday afternoon against Connecticut General Life Insurance Co., claiming breach of contract because the insurer denied the Astros’ claim to recoup $15.6 million of injured first baseman Jeff Bagwell’s $17 million contract … The Astros filed the insurance claim late in January, a few days prior to the Jan. 31 deadline. On March 28, Connecticut General rejected the claim, contending Bagwell had not become more disabled since he played in the World Series in October 2005.

From 2003, regarding Randy Myers:

The club contended the famous insurance carrier acted in bad faith when it denied a claim by the Padres over whether the club was due $8 million compensation for the two seasons (1999-2000) that Myers was unable to play because of arm injuries … After filing a claim, the Padres heard nothing from the carrier for 16 months, according to court papers. Lloyd’s balked at paying the claim and, according to court papers, argued two apparently conflicting points. The insurer said that Myers’ disabling injury occurred in April 1999, after the insurance policy expired. Lloyd’s also contended that Myers’ health problems could have been diagnosed as early as 1993 before the policy was enacted.

But sure, even though insurance companies fight $8 million and $17 million claims for years, there is every reason to think that one wouldn’t fight a $114 million claim for A-Rod.  They’d clearly understand that paying up was in the best interest of the Yankees and their fans and do their duty, right?

(thanks to readers @GrandCards and Chris Garber for the links)

Video: J.D. Martinez hits league-tying 23rd home run

Seattle Mariners v Boston Red Sox
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The Red Sox and Mariners left nothing on the table Friday night, going head-to-head in a series opener that eventually ended 14-10 in the Sox’ favor. Led by Steven Wright and Wade LeBlanc — neither of whom made it past the fifth inning — the teams combined for 34 hits and four home runs, including two moonshots from Seattle’s Nelson Cruz and a five-run rally that gave Boston the edge in the seventh.

In the sixth inning, however, the Red Sox were still scrambling to make up a four-run deficit. Left fielder J.D. Martinez cut it in half with one swing, pouncing on an 89.5-mph fastball from Seattle right-hander Nick Vincent and posting it to dead center field for a two-run shot.

The 427-foot blast was Martinez’s 23rd of the season, tying Mike Trout for the most home runs in the league this year. While he still has a ways to go before eclipsing the career-best 45-HR mark he set in 2017, he’s off to a strong start this season: Entering Friday’s game, the 30-year-old slugger was batting .315/.386/.623 with a 1.009 OPS and AL-leading 55 RBI in 308 PA. He finished Friday’s game 4-for-5 with five RBI, just one triple shy of hitting for the cycle.

Heading into the All-Star Break, both Martinez and Trout still have some competition for the home run title. Jose Ramirez is sitting at 22 homers, while Nelson Cruz and Khris Davis are tied at 20 apiece.