The Yankees would be crazy to sue A-Rod in an attempt to void his deal

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I offer this from Pete Abraham’s Twitter feed, but I’m not trying to single Pete out. Many people have made such comments this morning, so I use his as mere example:

 

The downsides:

  • The could lose the suit because anyone can lose any suit;
  • They could lose the suit in such a way that actually creates legal precedent that makes it harder to go after drug users or otherwise misbehaving players;
  • Win or lose they will cost themselves millions if not tens of millions in legal fees;
  • If they lose they have a player under contract who is alienated from the team to the nth degree, making life much harder;
  • Win or lose their employees will miss tons of work for depositions, preparation and the like;
  • Win or lose a lawsuit may cause potential free agents to avoid the Yankees because they believe, rationally or not, that the team is just waiting to pounce on its players in the event they make any missteps.
  • Mostly, though, because lawsuits are awful;

As for winning or losing: there is a means for a PED-user to have his contract voided: being disciplined three times, which leads to a lifetime ban.  For the Yankees to attempt to void the deal now is the equivalent of that, financially speaking, and I’d have a hard time seeing a court or an arbitrator agree that they can simply leapfrog over two suspensions like that to cost A-Rod the $114 million left on his deal.

If there is discipline, it will be a 50-game suspension. And it may not happen at all.  Let’s not jump the gun here.

Twins designate Phil Hughes for assignment

AP Photo/Ron Schwane
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Phil Hughes was officially designated for assignment by the Twins on Tuesday, the culmination of multiple injury-plagued seasons and poor performance.

Things couldn’t have started out much better for Hughes in Minnesota. The former Yankees hurler joined the Twins on a three-year, $24 million contract in December of 2013 and reeled off a 3.52 ERA over 32 starts during his first season with the club. He set the MLB record (which still stands, by the way) for single season strikeout-to-walk ratio and even received some downballot Cy Young Award consideration. The big year resulted in the two sides ripping up their previous agreement with a new five-year, $58 million deal, but it was all downhill after that.

Hughes took a step back with a 4.40 ERA in 2015 and struggled with a 5.95 ERA over 11 starts and one relief appearance in 2016 before undergoing surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome. He wasn’t any better upon his return last year, putting up a 5.87 ERA in nine starts and five relief appearances. Hughes missed time with a biceps issue and required a thoracic outlet revision surgery in August. He began this year on the disabled list with an oblique injury, only to put up a 6.75 ERA over two starts and five relief appearances before the Twins decided to turn the page this week.

Hughes is still owed the remainder of his $13.2 million salary for this year and another $13.2 million next year. The deal didn’t work out as anyone would have hoped, but unfortunately this is another case of health just not cooperating.