The Yankees would be crazy to sue A-Rod in an attempt to void his deal

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I offer this from Pete Abraham’s Twitter feed, but I’m not trying to single Pete out. Many people have made such comments this morning, so I use his as mere example:

 

The downsides:

  • The could lose the suit because anyone can lose any suit;
  • They could lose the suit in such a way that actually creates legal precedent that makes it harder to go after drug users or otherwise misbehaving players;
  • Win or lose they will cost themselves millions if not tens of millions in legal fees;
  • If they lose they have a player under contract who is alienated from the team to the nth degree, making life much harder;
  • Win or lose their employees will miss tons of work for depositions, preparation and the like;
  • Win or lose a lawsuit may cause potential free agents to avoid the Yankees because they believe, rationally or not, that the team is just waiting to pounce on its players in the event they make any missteps.
  • Mostly, though, because lawsuits are awful;

As for winning or losing: there is a means for a PED-user to have his contract voided: being disciplined three times, which leads to a lifetime ban.  For the Yankees to attempt to void the deal now is the equivalent of that, financially speaking, and I’d have a hard time seeing a court or an arbitrator agree that they can simply leapfrog over two suspensions like that to cost A-Rod the $114 million left on his deal.

If there is discipline, it will be a 50-game suspension. And it may not happen at all.  Let’s not jump the gun here.

RHP Fairbanks, Rays agree to 3-year, $12 million contract

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Dave Nelson/USA TODAY Sports
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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Reliever Pete Fairbanks and the Tampa Bay Rays avoided arbitration when they agreed Friday to a three-year, $12 million contract that could be worth up to $24.6 million over four seasons.

The deal includes salaries of $3,666,666 this year and $3,666,667 in each of the next two seasons. The Rays have a $7 million option for 2026 with a $1 million buyout.

His 2024 and 2025 salaries could increase by $300,000 each based on games finished in the previous season: $150,000 each for 35 and 40.

Tampa Bay’s option price could increase by up to $6 million, including $4 million for appearances: $1 million each for 60 and 70 in 2025; $500,000 for 125 from 2023-25 and $1 million each for 135, 150 and 165 from 2023-25. The option price could increase by $2 million for games finished in 2025: $500,000 each for 25, 30, 35 and 40.

Fairbanks also has a $500,000 award bonus for winning the Hoffman/Rivera reliever of the year award and $200,000 for finishing second or third.

The 29-year-old right-hander is 11-10 with a 2.98 ERA and 15 saves in 111 appearances, with all but two of the outings coming out of the bullpen since being acquired by the Rays from the Texas Rangers in July 2019.

Fairbanks was 0-0 with a 1.13 ERA in 24 appearances last year after beginning the season on the 60-day injured list with a right lat strain.

Fairbanks made his 2022 debut on July 17 and tied for the team lead with eight saves despite being sidelined more than three months. In addition, he is 0-0 with a 3.60 ERA in 12 career postseason appearances, all with Tampa Bay.

He had asked for a raise from $714,400 to $1.9 million when proposed arbitration salaries were exchanged Jan. 13, and the Rays had offered for $1.5 million.

Fairbanks’ agreement was announced two days after left-hander Jeffrey Springs agreed to a $31 million, four-year contract with Tampa Bay that could be worth $65.75 million over five seasons.

Tampa Bay remains scheduled for hearings with right-handers Jason Adam and Ryan Thompson, left-hander Colin Poche, third baseman Yandy Diaz and outfielder Harold Ramirez.