If you’re busted for steroids it’s better to clam up than to come clean

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You hear it every time an athlete is busted for PEDs: “He/she needs to come clean and explain what he/she did. Only then can he/she begin to repair the damage to his/her reputation and legacy he/she has done.”

Bollocks:

MM Haigh found that baseball players who apologized to their fans were no more likely to receive positive news coverage than those who did not. Jessica Korn studied polling data (pdf) and discovered that admission and apology actually resulted in decreased favorability, while denial was a more successful PR strategy.

This comes in a piece at The Guardian by Harry Enten about how Lance Armstrong’s confession to Oprah was actually way more damaging to his favorability ratings than merely staying silent would have done.

If you’re 2002 Ken Caminiti and you’re just looking for a way to clear your conscience, cool, go public. But if you’re actually interested in protecting or preserving your popularity or legacy or reputation or whatever, going public about your PED use is counterproductive. Which shouldn’t be surprising given how every single public confession of PED use is followed up with sports writers penning columns about how the apology or confession was insincere, too late or otherwise inadequate.

It’s almost as if those sports writers who say that the athlete should confess his sins are really just interested in more column fodder.

(thanks to Ethan for the heads up)

The Dodgers do not have a general manager, but they have an assistant general manager

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LAS VEGAS — Farhan Zaidi left his job as the general manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers to become the president of baseball operations for the San Francisco Giants. While Dodgers president Andrew Friedman remains at the top of the baseball operations department, Zaidi’s departure has left the Dodgers without a general manager. It happens. It also happens that the Dodgers do not plan to replace Zaidi with a new general manager any time soon. They just said so last week.

They do, however, have an assistant general manager now. It’s Jeff Kingston, late of the Seattle Mariners, where he served as Jerry Dipoto’s assistant. Now he is an assistant with no one, nominally, to assist. Seems like some sort of dividing by zero error, philosophically speaking, but we’ll just assume it’ll sort itself out.

Two less cosmic takeaways from this: 1. Kingston is an analytics guy who has typically advised the wheeler-dealer — Dipoto — so it’s fairly safe to assume he’ll do that in Los Angeles too; and 2. that a team is happy to proceed without a general manager should tell you where general managers, well, in general, stand in this age of title inflation in baseball front offices.

I imagine that, after some time in the organization, Kingston will be named the actual general manager with no real change in his duties, further underscoring that, in this day and age, the title of GM is like the value of a Zimbabwean dollar.