The Phillies sign Delmon Young

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My prayers have been answered:

I think this was a masterful move by Ruben Amaro. With Young in the fold, Ryan Howard and Chase Utley will once again — by comparison anyway — look like their former MVP-caliber selves.  And, on a personal note, this is quite the accomplishment for Amaro inasmuch there were probably many people out there doubting that he could find any possible way to continue to block Domonic Brown. Well, Ruben showed them. He showed them good. Next year he’ll block Brown with an inanimate carbon rod.

Seriously, though: Delmon Young is a free agent who hit 22 18 home runs last year yet is making Mark DeRosa money. Heck, he’s making first-year arbitration-eligible player money.  You may beat the “hey, he’s not bad, he hits some homers and bats .270” drum all you like, but Major League Baseball just valued this guy at $750K, and that has to tell you something about what to expect.

UPDATE: For those of you saying that Domonic Brown won’t be blocked or that Delmon will only be a pinch hitter or bat boy or something:

 

Yup.

Hunter Pence is mashing for the Rangers

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Hunter Pence was thought to be on his way to retirement after a lackluster 2018 season with the Giants. As he entered his mid-30’s, Pence spent a considerable amount of time on the injured list, playing in 389 out of 648 possible regular season games with the Giants from 2015-18.

Pence, however, kept his career going, inking a minor league deal with the Rangers in February. He performed very well in spring training, earning a spot on the Opening Day roster. Pence hasn’t stopped hitting.

Entering Monday night’s game against the Mariners, Pence was batting .299/.358/.619 with eight home runs and 28 RBI in 109 plate appearances, mostly as a DH. Statcast agrees that Pence has been mashing the ball. He has an average exit velocity of 93.3 MPH this season, which would obliterate his marks in each of the previous four seasons since Statcast became a thing. His career average exit velocity is 89.8 MPH. He has “barreled” the ball 10.4 percent of the time, well above his 6.2 percent average.

What Pence did to a baseball in the seventh inning of Monday’s game, then, shouldn’t come as a surprise.

That’s No. 9 on the year for Pence. Statcast measured it at 449 feet and 108.3 MPH off the bat. Not only is Pence not retired, he may be a lucrative trade chip for the Rangers leading up to the trade deadline at the end of July.