The Hall of Fame might be broken, but not in the way you think it is

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As a part of my friend Michael Clair’s charity blog-a-thon, I wrote about how Hall of Fame voting might — might, not definitely — be broken. But not in quite the way a lot of people have been saying over the past couple of weeks.  Rather, it’s turning into weird, divisive and gridlocked politics much akin to what goes down in Congress. You can read it in its entirety over at Old Time Family Baseball. An excerpt:

Congress has always been nasty, but there were always matters which were subject to logrolling and compromise which didn’t necessarily become points on which the parties would choose to do battle.  Now nearly every topic, no matter how far removed from the main planks of either party’s platform, sees the same level of polarization and combat that the bigger social issues and battles over entitlements typically occasion. I mean, lawmakers now consider basic empirical facts to be the subject of political argument for crying out loud. The previously non-political is increasingly becoming political.

Might things be heading in that direction in baseball?

Click through to see the answer to that question.

And again, it’s for a good cause. The charity blog-a-thon for which that bit was written, is to support Doctors Without Borders. It ends soon, but for the past 24 hours Michael has been running guest posts by all kinds of great baseball writers. It’s great stuff, so by all means, check it out and consider a donation.

The Red Sox designate Hanley Ramirez for assignment

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The Boston Red Sox activated Dustin Pedroia from the disabled list today. That’s a big deal. The move they made to make room for him on the roster was a big one too: they designated Hanley Ramirez for assignment. A designation for assignment, of course, means that the Sox have seven days to either trade or release Ramirez.

Ramirez, 34, is experiencing his worst season as a major leaguer thus far, hitting .254/.313/.395 (88 OPS+) in 195 plate appearances as he split time between first base and designated hitter. Given how well Mitch Moreland has hit at first and J.D. Martinez has hit at DH, there is simply no room for Ramirez in the lineup. At the moment the Red Sox have the second best offense in all of baseball despite Ramirez’s performance.

Ramirez, a 14-year big league veteran, won the 2006 Rookie of the Year Award and won the NL batting title in 2009. He has been a below average hitter in three of his last four seasons, however and, long removed from his days as a middle infielder, he has little defensive value these days. That said, his fame and the possibility that he could put together a decent run if used wisely will likely get him some looks from other clubs.