Earl Weaver: 1930-2013

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Sad news to pass along from Baltimore, as MASN Sports’ Roch Kubatko reports that Hall of Fame manager Earl Weaver passed away last night. He was 82 years old.

An iconic figure with the Orioles, Weaver compiled a 1,480-1,060 record over 17 seasons as the team’s manager. This included stints from 1968-1982 and from 1985-1986. Known for his unique wit and progressive baseball strategy, Weaver led the club to six American League East titles, four pennants and a World Series title in 1970.

Weaver is 22nd all-time in managerial wins and ninth all-time in winning percentage. His fiery personality often led to some legendary arguments with umpires. Only Bobby Cox and John McGraw were ejected in more games.

Weaver was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1996 while his No. 4 is one of six numbers retired by the Orioles. He was present last June when the Orioles unveiled a statue with his likeness at Camden Yards.

So long to a true baseball legend.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.