Arbitration filings: Chase Headley’s $10.3 million request leads way

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Here’s the breakdown of the 36 arbitration cases remaining after Friday’s filings:

American League (player filing amount – team filing amount – 2012 salary)

Baltimore

Jason Hammel – $8.25 million – $5.7 million ($4.75 million in 2012)
Jim Johnson – $7.1 million – $5.7 million ($2.775 million in 2012)
Darren O’Day – $3.2 million – $1.8 million ($1.35 million in 2012)

Boston

Craig Breslow – $2.375 million – $2.325 million ($1.795 million in 2012)

Cleveland

Mike Aviles – $3.4 million – $2.4 million ($1.2 million in 2012)

Detroit

Max Scherzer – $7.4 million – $6.05 million ($3.75 million in 2012)

Los Angeles

Alberto Callaspo – $4.7 million – $3.65 million ($3.15 million in 2012)
Kevin Jepsen – $1.4 million – $975,000 ($501,000 in 2012)

New York

David Robertson – $3.65 million – $2.85 million ($1.625 million in 2012)

Seattle

Shawn Kelley – $1.2 million – $750,000 ($610,000 in 2012)

Texas

David Murphy – $6.5 million – $5.05 million ($3.65 million in 2012)

National League

Arizona

Gerardo Parra – $2.7 million – $2.1 million ($502,000 in 2012)
Cliff Pennington – $2.8 million – $1.8 million ($490,000 in 2012)

Atlanta

Martin Prado – $7.05 million – $6.65 million ($4.75 million in 2012)

Cincinnati

Homer Bailey – $5.8 million – $4.75 million ($2.5 million in 2012)
Shin-Soo Choo – $8 million – $6.75 million ($4.9 million in 2012)
Chris Heisey – $1.65 million – $1.05 million ($495,000 in 2012)
Mat Latos – $4.7 million – $4.15 million ($550,000 in 2012)
Mike Leake – $3.5 million – $2.65 million ($507,500 in 2012)
Alfredo Simon – $1.05 million – $750,000 ($487,500 in 2012)

Colorado

Jhoulys Chacin – $2.6 million – $1.7 million ($482,000 in 2012)
Dexter Fowler – $5.15 million – $4.25 million ($2.35 million in 2012)
Jonathan Herrera – $1 million – $800,000 ($482,000 in 2012)

New York

Ike Davis – $3.7 million – $2.825 million ($506,690 in 2012)
Daniel Murphy – $3.4 million – $2.55 million ($512,196 in 2012)

Pittsburgh

James McDonald – $3.4 million – $2.65 million ($502,500 in 2012)
Neil Walker – $3.6 million – $3 million ($500,000 in 2012)

St. Louis

David Freese – $3.75 million – $2.4 million ($518,000 in 2012)
Jason Motte – $5.5 million – $4.5 million ($2 million in 2012)
Marc Rzepczynski – $1.3 million – $900,000 ($501,000 in 2012)

San Diego

Luke Gregerson – $3.75 million – $2.875 million ($1.55 million in 2012)
Chase Headley – $10.3 million – $7.075 million ($3.475 million in 2012)
Clayton Richard – $5.5 million – $4.905 million ($2.705 million in 2012)

San Francisco

Joaquin Arias – $1.1 million – $750,000 ($525,000 in 2012)
Sergio Romo – $4.5 million – $2.675 million ($1.575 million in 2012)

Washington

Jordan Zimmermann – $5.8 million – $4.6 million ($2.3 million in 2012)

Some thoughts

– Callaspo and the Angels are expected to avoid arbitration by finalizing a two-year deal in the coming days.

– It’s incredibly bizarre that the Red Sox came to terms with seven of their eight remaining arbitration players today, yet couldn’t close the ridiculously tiny $50,000 gap with Breslow. Maybe they just ran out of people capable of negotiating; they were all on the phone with other players.

– Prado’s gap is also really small considering the amounts involved ($7.05 million-$6.65 million). It’s hard to see that one going before a panel.

– Headley’s $3.225 million gap with the Padres is the biggest spread in dollars, but others are bigger proportionately. O’Day is asking for nearly twice what the Orioles are offering ($3.2 million-$1.8 million. Romo’s request is 70 percent higher than the Giants’ offer. Freese’s is nearly 60 percent higher than the Cardinals’ proposal.

Rumor: MLB execs discussing 100-game season that would begin July 1

David Price and Mookie Betts
Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images
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Matt Spiegel of 670 The Score Chicago heard from a source that Major League Baseball executives have been discussing a 100-game season that would begin on July 1 and conclude on October 15. It would essentially pick up the second half schedule, eliminating the All-Star Game while hosting the World Series at a neutral warm-weather stadium — ideally Dodger Stadium.

In the event the Dodgers, who won 106 games last year, made it all the way through the playoffs, the World Series would be hosted in Anaheim or San Diego. The earlier rounds of the playoffs would be played in the cities of the teams involved, which might be tough since the postseason would extend into November.

Spiegel went on to describe this vision as “an absolute best case scenario,” and that’s accurate. In order for the regular season to begin on July 1, the players would need to have several weeks if not a full month prior to get back into playing shape — more or less an abbreviated second spring training. And that would mean the U.S. having made significant progress against the virus by way of herd immunity or a vaccine, which would allow for nonessential businesses to resume operations. The U.S., sadly, is faring not so well compared to other nations around the world for a variety of reasons, but all of which point to a return to normalcy by the summer seeming rather unlikely.

Regardless, the league does have to plan for the potential of being able to start the regular season this summer just in case things really do break right and offer that opportunity. Commissioner Rob Manfred has stated multiple times about the league’s need to be creative, referring to ideas like playing deep into the fall, changing up the location of games, playing without fans in attendance, etc. This rumor certainly fits the “creative” mold.