Might a network help out a team on a bad TV rights deal stay competitive?

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Dave O’Brien of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution spoke with Braves CEO Terry McGuirk about team finances and TV deals, and the conversation puts the disparity between teams with good deals and teams with bad deals into sharp relief: the Braves’ deal is rumored to be between $10-20 million annually. The Dodgers are looking at deals that could pay them $240 million annually. Yikes.

Still, McGuirk claims that the competition having a ten-fold plus advantage in annual TV money is not crippling to the Braves.  He also strongly agreed with this idea, which is one I’ve not really heard anyone mention before with respect to the disparity in TV deals:

McGuirk was asked about this hypothetical situation: If the TV deal someday put the Braves at a disadvantage and undermined their roster construction and their on-field performance, might it be in the TV rights holder’s best interest to reconsider the terms of the remaining part of the deal if it would help the team on the field and presumably in the TV ratings?

I suppose I can envision a situation where a network with baseball rights tells the team that it would chip in a little more to help the team sign some hyper-marketable player that could have an instant impact on the TV ratings. Think free agent Bryce Harper one day or something. But as for a network, in effect, becoming a team’s partner, sitting down and ensuring that the team is remaining competitive, eh, I’ll believe it when I see it.

Peter Bourjos returns to the Angels on minor league deal

Peter Bourjos
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Free agent outfielder Peter Bourjos is heading back to the Angels on a minor league deal, per a report from Steve Adams of MLB Trade Rumors. The agreement includes an invitation to spring training, but has not yet been officially confirmed by the team.

Bourjos, 31, played out a one-year gig with the Braves in 2018 and slashed .205/.239/.364 with four extra-base hits and a .603 OPS through a career-low 47 plate appearances. He showed more promise during a short-lived stint with the Giants’ Triple-A squad in the second half of the season, but elected free agency in early November and had yet to catch on with another major league club. His deal with the Angels represents a homecoming of sorts, as he played some of the best years of his career in Anaheim from 2010 to 2013 before getting traded to the Cardinals in a multiplayer swap for David Freese and Fernando Salas in 2014.

The veteran outfielder is long past his prime, but could still bring some value to the team as outfield depth behind Justin Upton, Mike Trout, and Kole Calhoun. Per Adams, he’s expected to compete for a spot as the Angels’ fourth outfielder, though he also has limited experience at DH as well.