Curt Schilling’s bloody sock goes up for auction

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Own a piece of history! And then do DNA testing on it to see if the conspiracy theorists were right and it was really just Karo syrup!

Former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling is selling the blood-stained sock he wore during the 2004 World Series after the collapse of his Providence-based video game company. The sports director at Heritage Auctions tells The Associated Press online bidding begins around Feb. 4. Live bidding will take place in New York City on Feb. 23.

The sock had been on loan to the National Baseball Hall of Fame. It’s now at Heritage’s Dallas headquarters and is expected to bring in at least $100,000.

Schilling listed the sock as collateral in his company’s bankruptcy filing back in October. Schilling also recently put his 26-acre, 20-room home in Massachusetts on the market.  The dude is obviously in trouble.

BBWAA, please: put this man in the Hall of Fame so he can charge more for his autograph at card shows and stuff. Help a brother out, will ya?

Twins to retire Joe Mauer’s No. 7

AP Photo/Jim Mone
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Twins senior director of communications Dustin Morse announced that the Twins will honor former C/1B Joe Mauer by retiring his uniform number 7. Mauer announced his retirement from baseball on November 9.

Mauer will join Harmon Killebrew (No. 3), Tony Oliva (No. 6), Tom Kelly (No. 10), Kent Hrbek (No. 14), Rod Carew (No. 29), Kirby Pucket (No. 34), and Bert Blyleven (No. 28) as Twins to have their numbers retired.

Mauer, 35, spent 15 seasons in the majors, all with the Twins. He posted a career .306/.388/.439 triple-slash line with 143 home runs and 923 RBI. He won the AL MVP Award in 2009, won the batting title three times, earned three Gold Gloves and five Silver Sluggers, and made the AL All-Star team six times. Sadly, his career was limited due to injuries, including a concussion that caused him to move from catcher to first base.

Five years from now, Mauer will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot. There will certainly be some arguments for and against his candidacy. He retired with 55.1 career Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference, which definitely puts him in the conversation. But, as always, there’s never a consensus.