Dodgers sign Jesus Flores to minor league deal

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Once upon a time Jesus Flores was a promising young catcher and part of the Nationals’ long-term plans, but injuries derailed his career and he was non-tendered after falling to third on the depth chart behind Kurt Suzuki and Wilson Ramos.

Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post reports that Flores has agreed to a minor-league deal with the Dodgers that includes an invitation to spring training, where he’ll compete to back up starter A.J. Ellis.

After missing most of 2009-2011 he played 83 games and logged 296 plate appearances last season, but Flores hit just .213 with a .577 OPS and threw out 15 percent of steal attempts.

At age 28 he seemingly has a decent shot to win a bench job in Los Angeles.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.