Denard Span probably needs to take a day off the Internet

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Whenever someone rails about the dangers and evils of professional athletes using Twitter, I simply say this: Twitter is like a microphone that is always on. An athlete saying something on Twitter is the functional equivalent of an athlete talking to a gaggle of reporters in front of his locker.  As long as he doesn’t say anything into that open mic — and as long as he knows that Twitter is, in fact, an open mic, he’s fine.

Call me crazy, but I don’t gather that Denard Span would ever be talking about sick, looney-tunes Sandy Hook killing conspiracy theory videos into an open mic in front of his locker. So the fact that he tweeted something like this is just as much evidence of poor Twitter training as it is evidence that some athletes have a hard time understanding what happens in the world:

Back away from the Twitter, Denard. Go down to spring training and leave this sort of thing to other people. You’ll be much happier that you did.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.