Great Moments in Changing One’s Mind

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In 2011, right after Bonds was convicted of obstruction of justice, Jon Heyman had this to say about Barry Bonds:

While I do believe Bonds took steroids, I don’t believe all steroid users should be excluded from the Hall of Fame. I’m not here to sit in moral judgment of another human being.

I was rather surprised at that when it happened, but was quite pleased too, lauding him for his sensible take.

Heyman did not cast a ballot for Barry Bonds in this year’s election, however, saying he “didn’t want to reward the cheats.” He went on Twitter last night to congratulate his colleagues for taking a stand against the steroid guys too, quite proud of barring the doors to the Hall of Fame to the likes of Barry Bonds.

Everyone is entitled to change their mind, of course. Indeed, the worst thing is for someone to make up their mind once about something and never reconsider it again. Facts on the ground change, people mature and their opinions change. We should always revisit or conclusions and test our convictions about things lest we turn into stubborn, calcified stumps.

But I’m not sure what happened in the past 21 months to change Heyman’s so thoroughly about Barry Bonds, and he has done nothing to explain why, in April 2011 Bonds was a Hall of Famer in his eyes and in December 2012 he couldn’t abide the thought.

Congratulations Justin Turner!

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Baseball is a young man’s game. Whereas, a few short years ago, teams went into battle with a lot of guys with ten or twelve years of experience under their belt, these days such veterans are a dying breed. Whether you chalk it up to teams favoring youth because youth is less expensive, the game simply favoring younger, more athletic players, the decline in PED use among ballplayers or some combination of all three, the fact is that it’s better to be 23 in Major League Baseball these days than 33.

But Dodgers third baseman Justin Turner is an exception.

Turner is 33 — he turns 34 in November — yet he remains at or near the top of his game. It’s been a shorter season than usual for him due to an injury that cost him all of April and part of May, but his production when healthy remains at a near-MVP level. He’s hitting .318/.413/.525 on the year, and his return coincided with the Dodgers shaking off their early-season doldrums. Now, with his help, they are on the verge of yet another NL West title.

Not only that, but he’s doing that while holding down a second job!

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Way to hustle, Justin!