Reminder: There are already steroids users in the Hall of Fame

120 Comments

Today, when the BBWAA elects either no one or, at best, two of over a dozen deserving candidates into the Hall of Fame, a lot of people will say they’re OK with that because it’s better to err on the side of caution than it is to allow a PED user to enter Cooperstown’s hallowed halls.  When they say this, remind them of the following passage from page 28 of the Mitchell Report:

In 1973, a Congressional subcommittee announced that its staff had completed an “in depth study into the use of illegal and dangerous drugs in sports” including professional baseball.  The subcommittee concluded that “the degree of improper drug use – primarily amphetamines and anabolic steroids – can only be described as alarming.”

Then remember — via Larry Granillo of Wezen-Ball from back in 2010 — that one Hall of Fame voter, Thomas Boswell of the Washington Post, has already said that he knows a current Hall of Famer used steroids. He said it on camera, in Ken Burns’ motherf—ing “Tenth Inning”:

“There was another player now in the Hall of Fame who literally stood with me and mixed something and I said “What’s that?” and he said “it’s a Jose Canseco milkshake”. And that year that Hall of Famer hit more home runs than ever hit any other year. So it wasn’t just Canseco, and so one of the reasons that I thought that it was an important subject was that it was spreading. It was already spreading by 1988.”

Steroid use in baseball was “alarming” as of 1973.  As of 1988 a guy who is now in the Hall of Fame was taking “Jose Canseco milkshakes,” which clearly meant steroids.

There is nothing left to protect. The “caution” that will be lauded today when so many worthy candidates fail to be elected will be empty and meaningless at best, active perpetuation of a double standard at worst.

Nick Senzel to miss a few weeks due to ankle injury

Rob Tringali/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Reds prospect Nick Senzel will miss at least the next few weeks due to a sprained right ankle, Bobby Nightengale of the Cincinnati Enquirer reports. Senzel suffered the injury in a minor league game on Monday, sliding into second base.

Last week, the Reds reassigned Senzel to minor league camp. His agent, Joel Wolfe, called it an “egregious case of service time manipulation.” The matter has been cleanly resolved with the injury, not unlike Vladimir Guerrero, Jr.

Senzel, 23, is the Reds’ No. 1 prospect, according to MLB Pipeline. He was getting work in center field this spring after playing second and third base last year (and even a game at shortstop) in the minors. With Triple-A Louisville, Senzel hit .310/.378/.509 with six home runs and 25 RBI in 193 plate appearances.