Why do writers vote on the Hall of Fame again?

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Usually people answer this by saying that they’re the best option we have.  Tim Marchman writes in the Wall Street Journal, however, that there is no particular reason to believe so:

The worst element, though, is that the writers debating all of this have the franchise even though there’s no real reason for them to have it: They have no special knowledge of the game relative to anyone else, and they’ve never done a good job.

The first point here, that writers know little more than anyone else, shouldn’t be especially controversial. The voters are (theoretically) good at writing about baseball, which has no obvious connection to assessing what players’ legacies mean within the broad context of 160 years of history. No one who wanted to know who the most important presidents of all time were would think to poll political reporters rather than historians or the public. Why do the same in baseball?

Fair enough point, though I’m still left with the idea that writers having the vote is the least worst option. Marchman’s suggestion — giving over the vote to the public — strikes me was worse than keeping it with the writers. Even among your friends who follow baseball quite a bit, aren’t you often amazed at how limited their grasp of baseball history is?

My brother was here over the holidays. He started watching baseball when I did and, though he’s more of a hockey fan these days, he still keeps generally apprised of what’s going on in the game. One day when he was here I had to explain to him why Nolan Ryan was not the greatest pitcher in the history of baseball. He wasn’t really buying my arguments. He was, however, buying the hype and legend-making that accompanied the latter part of Ryan’s career. I think that would be pretty common with a public vote for the Hall of Fame. The “fame” part would pretty much take over the process.

I do agree with Marchman that those who vote for the Hall of Fame aren’t automatically qualified simply because they happened to write about the game for a bit, but I think the solution to that is to simply do better at choosing the pool of writers who vote rather than take it away from them entirely.

Angels acquire Odrisamer Despaigne from Marlins

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The Angels announced on Tuesday night that the club acquired pitcher Odrisamer Despaigne from the Marlins for cash considerations. Pitcher Dayan Diaz was designated for assignment to make room on the 40-man roster for Despaigne.

Despaigne, 31, posted a lackluster 5.31 ERA with 18 strikeouts and eight walks in 20 1/3 innings for the Marlins before being optioned to Triple-A New Orleans in early June. Despaigne has even struggled at Triple-A compiling a 4.47 ERA with a 41/13 K/BB ratio in 44 1/3 innings.

Despaigne has spent about equal time starting and relieving in his major league career, so he could operate as a swingman for the Angels. Otherwise, he’ll serve as pitching depth.