Baseball is still number two, but here comes college football

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One of the reasons today is such a slow news day baseball-wise is because the sporting world is focused on tonight’s Alabama-Notre Dame game. It’s a focus that mirrors the increasing popularity of college football. Which, some say, may soon overtake baseball as the nation’s second most popular sport.

Baseball still has more viewers — 48% of adults watched an MLB game as opposed to 39% watching college football — but college football is gaining ground:

Other research indicates the Grand Old Game is still No. 2. But the power and pageantry of college football is grabbing younger consumers. Numbers are trending in the direction of college football. In the latest Harris Poll, 16% of adults cited baseball as their favorite sport, compared to 11% for college football. Baseball’s actually up three points from last year, when the two sports were tied at 13% while college football dropped two points. But since Harris started tracking America’s favorite sports in 1985, college football has gained 1%, while baseball has gone down 7%.

You know my take on this. Who cares? Bud Light sells more than Stone IPA and Justin Bieber sells more than Neil Young and yet I still like what I like, you like what you like and so to shall it always be with sports.

But it is interesting to see the surge of college football, especially given the public hits it has taken in recent years, what with scandals and greater reporting of its excesses and its corruption. Fans don’t care. They like the product and, our different tastes and the hand-wringing of some aside, there is no reason why they shouldn’t.

Report: Welington Castillo to be suspended 80 games for violating Joint Drug Agreement

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic confirms a report from journalist Américo Celado that White Sox catcher Welington Castillo will be suspended 80 games for violating baseball’s Joint Drug Agreement. Castillo was believed to have used a steroid, but according to Rosenthal, the substance was not a steroid. More details should come on Thursday.

Castillo, 31, entered Wednesday’s action batting .270/.314/.477 with six home runs and 15 RBI in 118 plate appearances. He has gotten the bulk of the work behind the plate, backed up by Omar Narváez.

Castillo’s absence will likely prompt the White Sox to call up Kevan Smith from Triple-A Charlotte. Smith battled an ankle injury in March and April, so he got a late start to the season. In 102 PA at Triple-A, he has hit .283/.343/.457.