Rangers and Lance Berkman agree to one-year, $11 million contract

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UPDATE: Jeff Wilson of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports that Berkman will need to get 525-550 at-bats for the 2014 option to vest. He hasn’t had that many at-bats in a season since 2008.

3:56 PM: CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman reports that Berkman will get a $10 million salary for 2013 while the vesting option includes a $1 million buyout.

3:42 PM: Multiple reports state that the deal is done, pending a physical. Rosenthal confirms that Berkman will get a one-year, $11 million deal with a vesting option for 2014. The Rangers will obviously look great if this works out, but they are taking on an awful lot of risk here.

3:22 PM: Rosenthal adds that Berkman’s deal with the Rangers is worth $10-11 million for one year. Given his age and knee issues, that seems a little rich.

2:28 PM: Nolan Ryan’s recruiting efforts have paid off.

FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal reports that the Rangers are finalizing an agreement with Lance Berkman. It’s expected to be a one-year deal with a possible vesting option. No word yet on the money involved.

Berkman was limited to just 32 games with the Cardinals last season due to knee and calf injuries, but he’s holding off on retirement for at least one more year. He also drew interest from his hometown Astros this winter, but he’ll obviously be in a better position to win with Texas.

While Berkman has previously referred to the American League-style of play as “Mickey Mouse,” he’ll likely serve as the Rangers’ primary designated hitter in 2013. The veteran slugger turns 37 in February and owns a .296/.409/.544 batting line over 14 seasons in the majors.

Jean Segura hits a three-run homer to put the AL up 5-2 in the eighth

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As we moved to the top of the eighth inning things started to loosen up. Which was good for the American League but not for the Senior Circuit.

Josh Hader of the Brewers was pitching and, in very un-2018-style, the American League strung together a couple of hits, with Shin-Soo Choo and George Springer singling. At that point Jen Segura of the Mariners came to the plate while Joe Buck spoke to National League outfielder Charlie Blackmon on the mic. Blackmon was entertaining until Joey Votto failed to corral a would-be foul out from Segura, at which point he tensed up a bit. Then Segura launched a massive three-run homer to left. Blackmon called Buck “bad luck,” Mitch Moreland singled and Blackmon said that if the next pitch wasn’t a double play ball, he was bailing on the broadcast.

With the Americans leading 5-2, Dave Roberts made a pitching change, bringing in Brad Hand with one out in the inning. Buck bid adieu to Blackmon, for which Blackmon seemed thankful. These mic’d up players are fun, but there’s a limit to how much distraction they’ll endure, even in a meaningless exhibition game.

Hand struck out Michael Brantley and then