Brayan Villarreal shut down from winter ball due to a sore elbow

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Jason Beck of MLB.com passes along word that Tigers reliever Brayan Villarreal has been shut down from the Venezuelan Winter League due to a sore elbow.

Villareal tossed three scoreless innings over three appearances with Caribes de Anzoategui before first complaining about his elbow in mid-December. Venezuelan newspaper El Universal reported that he was immediately brought back to the United States for tests, which revealed inflammation but no structural damage. That report has since been confirmed by the Tigers.

Villareal was originally expected to resume throwing yesterday, which would have left open the possibility of him pitching during the playoffs, but the Tigers have decided to play things safe and have him focus on being ready for spring training. The 25-year-old right-hander also dealt with some inflammation in his elbow back in August, so it’s tough to blame them.

Villareal posted a 2.63 ERA and 66/28 K/BB ratio over 54 2/3 innings last season. Armed with a fastball that sits in the mid-to-high 90s, he projects to pitch in middle relief again in 2013, but the opportunity could be there for him to earn a more prominent late-inning role.

 

Rays lose, clinching postseason berth for Athletics

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The Rays lost 4-1 to the Yankees on Monday night, which clinched a postseason berth for the Athletics just as they began their own game against the Mariners. For the 94-62 A’s, it’s their first postseason appearance since 2014 when they lost the AL Wild Card game to the Royals.

Major League Baseball celebrated the Athletics’ achievement by tweeting this fact: The A’s are the first team since 1988 to make the postseason with baseball’s lowest Opening Day payroll ($66 million).

Yay?

John J. Fisher, who has owned the A’s since 2005, has a net worth approaching $3 billion. The Athletics franchise is valued at over $1 billion. Yet the A’s have never had an Opening Day payroll at $90 million or above and have consistently been among the teams with the lowest payrolls. The cultural shift towards embracing analytics has allowed the A’s to get away with investing as little money as possible into the team. Moneyball helped change baseball’s zeitgeist such that many began to fetishize doing things on the cheap and now the league itself is embracing it.

What the fact MLB tweeted says is actually this: John J. Fisher was able to save a few bucks this year and the A’s still somehow made it to the postseason.

The Athletics’ success is due to a whole host of players, but particularly youngsters Matt Olson, Matt Chapman, Sean Manaea, Daniel Mengden, Lou Trivino, among others. All are pre-arbitration aside from Manaea. When it comes time to pay them something approaching what they’re actually worth, will the A’s reward them for their contributions or will they do what they’ve always done and cut bait? After reaching the postseason in 2014, the A’s traded away Josh Donaldson, Brandon Moss, Jeff Samardzija, and John Jaso. Each was a big influence on the club’s success. Athletics fans should be happy their favorite team has reached the postseason, but if the team’s history is any precedent, they shouldn’t get attached to any of the players. Is that really something Major League Baseball should be advocating?